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July 7
1919 - Mike Shuman, Placerita Junior High School principal, born in Fitchburg, Mass. [story]


SACRAMENTO – To stabilize the legal marijuana market and boost California’s coffers, a report issued Tuesday recommends that the state consider major changes to its marijuana taxes framework, including scrapping a cultivation tax for a potency-based scheme.

The Legislative Analyst’s Office says the state should shift to a tiered system that would tax based on the strength and type of cannabis products. The nonpartisan adviser says a series of reforms could bring uniformity to and simplify a system that hasn’t slowed the underground market or met tax revenue expectations since voters legalized recreational use in 2016.

“We view reducing harmful use as the most compelling reason to levy an excise tax,” the 30-page report states. “Accordingly, we recommend that the Legislature replace the existing retail excise tax and cultivation tax with a potency-based or tiered ad valorem tax, as these taxes could reduce harmful use more effectively.”

California’s rollout of legal pot has been rocky to say the least, as the industry claims it’s being overtaxed, overregulated and kept out of some counties and cities that refuse to issue business permits. In addition, critics say the state’s tax scheme is too complex and that startup costs associated with opening a legal marijuana business have given the black market an edge.

Instead of reducing taxes, as other states have done, the state has decided to go the other direction.

State regulators in November incensed growers and retailers by announcing tax hikes on legal marijuana. In January, the wholesaler markup rate will increase from 60% to 80%, along with 4% increases per ounce on flowers, leaves and fresh marijuana.

The legal marijuana industry blasted the decision and said it would force Californians to flee retailers for the black market.

Tax revenue from legal pot has fallen well short of the state’s lofty initial expectations. The state hoped for a windfall of $1 billion or more per year from pot, but collected only $345 million during the first year of sales in 2018.

The legal industry and others are hoping that the report titled “How High? Adjusting California’s Cannabis Taxes” will lead to action during the 2020 legislative session.

The California Cannabis Industry Association said the Tuesday report falls in line with reforms it has been seeking for three years and thanked the authors.

“This report comes at a particularly difficult period of growth for the state’s legal cannabis businesses,” the association said in a statement. “As California’s regulated market struggles against a thriving illicit industry, we believe that comprehensive tax reform will incentivize consumers to purchase regulated cannabis products, ease administration and compliance and increase and stabilize revenues for the state.”

Oakland Assemblyman Rob Bonita, who in January tried to reduce the voter-approved state excise tax from 15% to 11%, said in a statement that the report shows the “status quo is not working” and that he is prepared to again push for tax relief.

“I am committed to reintroducing legislation to temporarily reduce and simplify the tax burden on licensed cannabis businesses. In states with more supportive regulatory conditions, we’ve seen the illicit market make up less than 30% of all sales, unlike in California, where about 75% of cannabis sales occur in the illicit market,” the Democratic lawmaker said. “We must take action to not only promote California’s fledging industry but also combat the illicit market with its unlicensed, untested and unsafe products.”

The long-awaited report is intended to guide potential changes to cannabis taxes in 2020 and lays out four types of methods lawmakers should consider: a basic retail excise tax, a potency-based method based on the amount tetrahydrocannabinol or THC in the products, a tiered system based on potency and/or product type and a weight-based system.

It compares the predicted impacts each system would have on the three main goals of voter-approved Proposition 64: undercutting the black market, ensuring stable tax revenue and discouraging underage use.

The report warns that any tax rate change will have trade-offs between the three goals.

For example, reducing tax rates may expand the legal market, but could reduce tax revenue. Reducing taxes could lead to higher rates of cannabis use among minors, but the state could capture more tax revenue.

Along with a new tax system, the analyst’s office recommends that the state simplify its tax collection process as well.

Cultivators, distributors and retailers today pay a combination of state and local taxes, which the report says can lead to difficulty and confusion.

“The current split of taxpaying responsibilities often involves cash changing hands multiple times, to problems with security, compliance and enforcement,” the report states.

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1 Comment

  1. Tax, tax, tax! That’s great for the State but not for seniors and disabled. Why do those dosing with Medical Marijuana, recommended and issued by a Ca. State Medical Board Licensed doctor, have to pay the same taxed amounts for product as a recreational marijuana user?

    It’s bad enough that the majority of primary care physicians will not recommend medical marijuana for their patients! Insurance companies will not endorse their participating physicians recommending medical marijuana, nor cover that office visit/consultation. Forces the poverty restricted patients to locate questionable physicians, or obtain the required paperwork on the internet, to obtain recommendation and pay top dollar for that paper. Then the same seniors and/or disabled, in efforts to avoid opioids and stop or reduce pain, must pay excessively taxed costs, which are the same as the recreational user. We can not even deduct off of our tax returns the cost of the doctor or the medication! From one disabled senior, where does this so-called “Compassionate Act” come into play?

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SCV NewsBreak
LOCAL NEWS HEADLINES
Tuesday, Jul 7, 2020
Soledad Fire at 68% Containment, Firefighters Monitoring Hot Spots
The fast-spreading brush fire that burned nearly 1,498 acres in Agua Dulce reached 68% containment by Tuesday morning, with firefighters still in the area scouting for potential flare-ups, according to Los Angeles County Fire Department officials.
Monday, Jul 6, 2020
Monday COVID-19 Roundup: 33rd SCV Resident Dies; New Cases Surge in 18-40 Demo
Another resident of the city of Santa Clarita has died due to COVID-19, the city's 26th fatality and the 33rd in the Santa Clarita Valley to date, according to the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health.
Monday, Jul 6, 2020
Tuesday SCV Air Quality: Unhealthy for Sensitive People
Air quality will be unhealthy for sensitive groups and individuals in the Santa Clarita Valley on Tuesday, July 7, according to the latest South Coast Air Quality Management District forecast.
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