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March 8
1913 - Castaic Range War: Chromicle ally Billy Rose shoots, wounds landowner William W. Jenkins [story]
Bill Jenkins


The Los Angeles County Health Officer has issued a Heat Advisory for Wednesday, July 24, as high temperatures (over 100 degrees Fahrenheit) have been forecast for the following areas:
– Santa Clarita Valley
– San Fernando Valley
– San Gabriel Valley

Precautions should be taken to avoid heat-related illness, especially by children who have sensitive conditions including heart disease, asthma, and other chronic respiratory diseases, individuals who participate in outdoor activities, older adults, caretakers of infants and children, and those sensitive to the heat. If the body does not cool properly, there is potential for heat-related illness. Heat-related illness can take different forms, ranging from general fatigue to muscular cramping to life-threatening heat stroke.

The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health (Public Health) offers the following recommendations during high temperatures:
– Drink plenty of non-alcoholic, caffeine-free beverages. Water is the best choice. It is important to drink fluids regardless of thirst, because you can become dehydrated without being thirsty.
– Stay in air-conditioning as much as possible. If your home is not air-conditioned, go to an air-conditioned place such as a cooling center, mall, movie theater, or library.
– Do not run fans in a room with the windows shut – you are only circulating hot air.
– Check regularly on elderly or home-bound friends and relatives.
– Eliminate strenuous activity such as running, biking and yard work when it is hot.
– Eat small meals and eat more often.
– If you must be outdoors, stay out of direct sunlight and seek shade; wear a wide-brimmed hat or use an umbrella to create your own shade.
– Wear lightweight, light-colored, loose-fitting clothing that helps sweat evaporate.
– If you must be outdoors, use a sunscreen with a SPF of at least 15 or higher.
– Ask your doctor if you are at particular risk because of a medical condition or current medication.

“When temperatures are high, even a few hours of exertion may cause severe dehydration, heat cramps, heat exhaustion and heat stroke. People who are frail or have chronic health conditions may develop serious health problems leading to death if they are exposed to high temperatures over several days,” said Muntu Davis, MD, MPH, Health Officer, Los Angeles County. “Thus, it is critically important to never leave children, elderly people, or pets unattended in homes with no air conditioning and particularly in vehicles, even if the windows are ‘cracked’ or open, as temperatures inside can quickly rise to life-threatening levels. If you have an elderly or infirm neighbor who is without air conditioning, make sure that they get to a cooling center or other air-conditioned space between the hours of 10:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m.”

For a list of cooling centers and information on heat-related illnesses and prevention, please visit the Public Health website at www.publichealth.lacounty.gov, or call 2-1-1. To locate the nearest cooling center, go to https://www.lacounty.gov/heat. Call your local cooling center for hours of operation.

“While it is very important that everyone take special care of themselves, it is equally important that we reach out and check on others, in particular those who are especially vulnerable to the harmful effects of high temperatures, including children, the elderly, and their pets,” said Dr. Davis. “High temperatures are not just an inconvenience, they can be dangerous and even deadly. But we can protect ourselves, our families, and our neighbors if we take steps to remain cool and hydrated.”

Schools, day camps, and non-school related sports organizations or athletes should take extra precautions during high temperatures. Practices and other outdoor activities should be scheduled for very early or very late in the day in order to limit the amount of time spent in the sun and heat.

Additional tips for those who must work or exercise outdoors:
– Ensure that cool drinking water is available.
– Drink water or electrolyte-replacing sports drinks often; do not wait until you are thirsty.
– Avoid drinking sweetened drinks, caffeine, and alcohol.
– Avoid drinking extremely cold water as this is more likely to cause cramps.
– Allow athletes or outdoor workers to take frequent rests.
– Pay attention to signs of dehydration which include dizziness, fatigue, faintness, headaches, muscle cramps, and increased thirst. Individuals with these symptoms should be moved to a cooler, shaded place, and given water or sport drinks. More severe signs of heat- related illness may include diminished judgment, disorientation, pale and clammy skin, a rapid and weak pulse, and/or fast and shallow breathing.
– Coaches, teachers, and employers should seek immediate medical attention for those exhibiting signs of heat-related illness.
– Avoid unnecessary exertion, such as vigorous exercise during peak sun hours, if you are outside or in a non-air-conditioned building.

Older adults and individuals with chronic medical conditions:
– During peak heat hours stay in an air-conditioned area. If you do not have access to air conditioning in your home, visit public facilities such as cooling centers, shopping malls, parks, and libraries to stay cool.
– Do not rely only on open windows or a fan as a primary way to stay cool. Use the air conditioner. If you’re on reduced income, find out more about the Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program, by calling (866) 675-6623 or contacting your utility provider.
– Older adults and those on certain medications may not exhibit signs of dehydration until several hours after dehydration sets in. Stay hydrated by frequently drinking cool water. If you’re on a special diet that limits liquids, check with your doctor for information on the amount of water to consume.
– Stay out of the sun if you do not need to be in it. When in the sun, wear a hat, preferably with a wide brim, and loose-fitting, light-colored clothing with long sleeves and pants to protect against sun damage. And remember to use sun screen and to wear sunglasses.

Infants and Children:
– Never leave children unattended in a vehicle, even with the windows ‘cracked’ or open. It is illegal to leave an infant or child unattended in a vehicle (California Vehicle Code Section 15620).
– Make sure they are given plenty of cool water to drink. Infants and young children can get dehydrated very quickly.
– Keep children indoors or shaded as much as possible.
– Dress children in loose, lightweight, and light-colored clothing.

Pets:
– Never leave a pet unattended in a vehicle, even with the windows ‘cracked’ or open.
– Outdoor animals should be given plenty of shade and clean drinking water.
– Do not leave pets outside in the sun.
P- ets should not be left in a garage as it can get very hot due to lack of ventilation and insulation.

Heat-Related Illnesses
Heat Cramps
Symptoms include muscular pains and spasms, usually in the stomach, arms or leg muscles.
Heat cramps are usually caused by heavy exertion, such as exercise, during high temperatures.
Although heat cramps are the least severe of all heat-related problems, they are usually the first signal that the body is having trouble coping with hot temperatures. Heat cramps should be treated immediately with rest, fluids and getting out of the heat.
Seek medical attention if pain is severe or nausea occurs.

Heat Exhaustion:
Symptoms include heavy sweating, pale and clammy moist skin, extreme weakness or fatigue, muscle cramps, headache, dizziness or confusion, nausea or vomiting, fast and shallow breathing, or fainting.
Heat exhaustion should be treated immediately with rest in a cool area, sipping water or a sports drink, applying cool and wet cloths and elevating the feet 12 inches.
If left untreated, heat exhaustion can lead to heat stroke.
Seek medical attention if the person does not respond to the above, basic treatment.

Heat Stroke:
Symptoms include flushed, hot, moist skin or a lack of sweat, high body temperature (above 103°F), confusion or dizziness, possible unconsciousness, throbbing headache, rapid, or strong pulse.
Heat stroke is the most severe heat-related illness and occurs when a person’s temperature control system, which produces sweat, stops working.
Heat stroke may lead to brain damage and death.
Heat stroke should be treated by calling 911 immediately and moving the person to a cool shaded area. Fan the person’s body and spray with water.

Los Angeles County residents and business owners, including people with disabilities and others with access and functional needs can call 2-1-1 for emergency preparedness information and other referral services. The toll-free 2-1-1 number is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. 211 LA County services can also be accessed by visiting www.211la.org.

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LOS ANGELES COUNTY HEADLINES
Friday, Mar 5, 2021
Los Angeles County Public Health officials on Friday confirmed 144 new deaths and 2,110 new cases of COVID-19 countywide, with 26,403 total cases in the Santa Clarita Valley.
Thursday, Mar 4, 2021
The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health confirmed Thursday 119 new deaths and 2,253 new cases of COVID-19, with 26,327 total cases in the Santa Clarita Valley.
Thursday, Mar 4, 2021
Los Angeles County Library is partnering with Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) to bring virtual arts programs to our communities, featuring LACMA teaching artists and staff.
Thursday, Mar 4, 2021
Because of the recent rainfall, Los Angeles County Health Officer, Muntu Davis, MD, MPH, is cautioning residents that bacteria, chemicals, debris, trash, and other public health hazards from city streets and mountain areas are likely to contaminate ocean waters at and around discharging storm drains, creeks, and rivers after a rainfall.
Wednesday, Mar 3, 2021
Los Angeles County Public Health officials on Wednesday confirmed 116 new deaths and 1,759 new cases of COVID-19 countywide, as Henry Mayo Newhall Hospital in Valencia reported its 144th fatality since the pandemic began.

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