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March 4
1940 - NYC premiere of "The Marines Fly High" starring Lucille Ball, filmed in Placerita Canyon [story] Marines Fly High


| Monday, Sep 24, 2018
Aerial photo of Newhall Ranch area, looking west toward Fillmore, May 20, 2010. | Photo: Stephen K. Peeples
Aerial photo of Newhall Ranch area, looking west toward Fillmore, May 20, 2010. | Photo: Stephen K. Peeples.

 

Separate hearings in Los Angeles Superior Court and before the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday will address a lawsuit and an appeal against the Newhall Ranch and NorthLake mixed-use developments, respectively, in the Santa Clarita Valley.

On Tuesday morning, Supervisors are set to gather public comment on the 3,150 NorthLake Specific Plan after several environmental groups and the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy appealed the Planning Commission’s approval.

Some materials, including the SEIR, are also available for review at the Castaic Library at 27971 Sloan Canyon Road in Castaic and the Stevenson Ranch Library at 25950 The Old Road.

The NorthLake hearing is set for 9:30 a.m. at 500 West Temple Street, Los Angeles 90012.

Interested parties unable to attend the hearing may send written comments to publichearing@bos.lacounty.gov. Reference Agenda Item #11 and send to the attention of Jodie Sackett of the Department of Regional Planning by mail to the above address, by fax to 213-626-0434 or by e-mail to jsackett@planning.lacounty.gov. For more information, call 213-974-6433.

In the Newhall Ranch case, the Santa Clarita Organization for Planning the Environment filed a lawsuit challenging the adequacy of the water supply secured by developer FivePoint Holdings for the first 6,000 units of the 21,500-unit project (the Mission and Landmark tracts).

County officials gave FivePoint the green light to begin the project in 2017, as did the 9th Circuit in 2018.

The Newhall Ranch hearing is set for the Stanley Mosk Courthouse, 111 N. Hill Street, Los Angeles 90012, on Tuesday starting at 1:30 p.m. Judge Fruin is set to preside in Dept. 15 on the third floor.

Newhall Ranch map SCOPE

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21 Comments

  1. We do not need anymore developments here in Santa Clarita, we have enough people here already, traffic is already worse than it ever has been. Stop already.

  2. We need Disney to buy all this land and build a Walt Disney World

  3. Scv is doomed. So is California.

  4. Karen Harris Karen Harris says:

    No more development!

  5. Lola Dyroy Lola Dyroy says:

    So are the hearings in LA or out here??

  6. And where will they be getting the water for all theses homes? Don’t tell us to conserve but keep building

  7. I guess they don’t remember that the freeways fell during the 94 earthquake. Yea…we need more homes out here. What is needed is more in/out access for SCV.

  8. we don’t need more homes

    • Debbie Shaffer says:

      Have lived in SCV nearly my entire, over half a century. When certain people decided to incorporate our valley into a city, with the false promises of “controlling development”, it was actually with the intent to literally control by allowing it to happen rather than to prevent it. They (as usual politicians ie city council) receive their kickbacks from developers. Our valley has been slowly devoured by the cancer of development ever since and don’t even get me started with the dozens of local businesses which have closed down from the greed of monopoly. Listen to the people who pay taxes and sacrifice to live in what was once a beautiful, beautiful valley, filled with FRESH air, farmlands, space to roam and small town values. Any public building has a maximum capacity and we over exceeded that number years ago. We are not self sustaining and if the quality of life does not kill us, the pollutants and insanity of over crowded conditions and traffic will. STOP BUILDING! STOP DEVELOPMENT!

      • SCVNews.com says:

        You’re right, certain people wanted to incorporate our valley into the city — but they were rebuffed by the state agency that decides such matters (L.A. County’s LAFCO). They were only allowed to include essentially only the “already built” parts into the city. The city has no control over development outside the city (e.g., Newhall Ranch, Northlake).

  9. GERARD says:

    Enough of the infill/saturation as local traffic congestion is bad already.Pass the Gorman/Centennial project and new homeowners can bypass the SCV

  10. Wendy Devine says:

    I moved to this valley in 1966 as a young girl. As you can imagine, there has been nothing but growth in the valley since then. The problem is, everyone that has moved here since then, love it and never want it to change – right after they got here with their families and their cars of course.

    Growth is inevitable in our valley. So if it has to be done, I want it done the right way. I believe that the plans that Newhall Ranch has for our new city is being done the right way with lots of preserved open space and a lot of commercial and industrial development made possible for people to work close to home. The parks and trails in the plan will provide a feeling of the great outdoors.

    Yes, I hate seeing our mountains plowed down too as much as anybody, but it is going to happen, so thank you to FivePoint for doing it right!

  11. Not Surprised says:

    Over $12.6 million a day! That’s why.

    Here’s a brief summary of how things work in SCV, LA County,…all over. The Chiquita Canyon Landfill legally agreed NOT to expand and to stop excepting trash when it met it’s capacity over 2 decades ago!

    Chiquita Canyon Landfill 2-18 financials: In the first quarter revenue was $1.14 billion, up $48.9 million over the prior-year period. Acquisitions completed since the year-ago period contributed about $38.7 million of revenue in the quarter and about $10.8 million net of divestures.

    source: Waste Connections, Inc. Q1 2018 Earnings Conference Call Transcript wasteconnections.investorroom.com/…/Q1+2018+WCN+Earnings+Call+Transcript.pd… May 3, 2018 – lastly, the permitted volume change at our Chiquita Canyon landfill in Q3 of last …. Adjusted net income in Q1 primarily excludes the impact of …
    [PDF]

    Sources say: The Chiquita Landfill omitted documents from it’s original contract in order to obtain expansion approval. Documents surfaced and have been ignored. $12.6 MILLION A DAY!

    In April of this year, roughly 20 years after it first gained permission to increase its capacity, the Chiquita Canyon Landfill was approved for expansion once again. The LA County Department of Regional Planning gave the landfill a 30-year extension, even though it had already exceeded the 23 million-ton maximum capacity mandated in 1997. Under the new agreement, the landfill is allowed to operate for three more decades, or until it reaches 60 million tons. It is also permitted to laterally expand its “existing waste footprint from 267 acres to 400 acres,” in addition to boosting its maximum elevation from 1,430 feet to 1,573 feet and doubling its disposal limits from 6,000 tons of waste per day to 12,000 tons per day.

    The LA County Department of Regional Planning acknowledged that the most serious concerns about the project were its potential health impacts, including possible increased risks of cancer and respiratory diseases. But ultimately it found that the landfill didn’t produce significant impacts to public health, nor did it adversely affect the welfare of its residents. The department also found that the landfill contributes significantly to helping LA county meet its waste-disposal needs: According to a 2015 county report, 55 percent of the total waste at Chiquita Canyon Landfill comes from the city of Los Angeles; 19 percent comes from other cities in LA county, and 13 percent comes from the city of Santa Clarita. The LA County Board of Supervisors unanimously approved the permit during a public hearing attended by anti-landfill activists in June.

    “There’s not a lot of attention brought to Val Verde, and I think a lot of it has to do with how its relationship with the landfill is,” says Erica Larsen Dockray, alluding to the fact that the company that operates the landfill also contributes a significant amount of money to the community every year. Santa Clarita Valley International Charter School has recognized Chiquita Canyon Landfill as a donor for the last six years, and over that same period of time, the landfill offered CalArts students annual scholarships based on a judged gallery show in which all of the art must be constructed from trash from the landfill.

    source: The link for below: https://la.curbed.com/2017/9/27/16351910/val-verde-landfill-eureka-villa-history-california

  12. Not Surprised says:

    How things like this happen: $12.6 million a day!

    The Chiquita Canyon Landfill off the 126 legally agreed to NOT expand or receive trash once it met capacity over 2 decades ago!

    Chiquita Canyon Landfill 2018 1st Qtr financials: In the first quarter revenue was $1.14 billion, up $48.9 million over the prior-year period.
    Acquisitions completed since the year-ago period contributed about $38.7 million of revenue in
    the quarter and about $10.8 million net of divestures.

    Source Link: Waste Connections, Inc. Q1 2018 Earnings Conference Call Transcript
    wasteconnections.investorroom.com/…/Q1+2018+WCN+Earnings+Call+Transcript.pd…
    May 3, 2018 – lastly, the permitted volume change at our Chiquita Canyon landfill in Q3 of last …. Adjusted net income in Q1 primarily excludes the impact of …
    [PDF]

    Note: Sources say Chiquita Canyon Landfill omitted documents in order to be granted approval to expand. Said documents have surfaced and been submitted, however…..$12.6 MILLION A DAY!

    n April of this year, roughly 20 years after it first gained permission to increase its capacity, the Chiquita Canyon Landfill was approved for expansion once again. The LA County Department of Regional Planning gave the landfill a 30-year extension, even though it had already exceeded the 23 million-ton maximum capacity mandated in 1997. Under the new agreement, the landfill is allowed to operate for three more decades, or until it reaches 60 million tons. It is also permitted to laterally expand its “existing waste footprint from 267 acres to 400 acres,” in addition to boosting its maximum elevation from 1,430 feet to 1,573 feet and doubling its disposal limits from 6,000 tons of waste per day to 12,000 tons per day.

    The LA County Department of Regional Planning acknowledged that the most serious concerns about the project were its potential health impacts, including possible increased risks of cancer and respiratory diseases. But ultimately it found that the landfill didn’t produce significant impacts to public health, nor did it adversely affect the welfare of its residents. The department also found that the landfill contributes significantly to helping LA county meet its waste-disposal needs: According to a 2015 county report, 55 percent of the total waste at Chiquita Canyon Landfill comes from the city of Los Angeles; 19 percent comes from other cities in LA county, and 13 percent comes from the city of Santa Clarita. The LA County Board of Supervisors unanimously approved the permit during a public hearing attended by anti-landfill activists in June.

    “There’s not a lot of attention brought to Val Verde, and I think a lot of it has to do with how its relationship with the landfill is,” says Erica Larsen Dockray, alluding to the fact that the company that operates the landfill also contributes a significant amount of money to the community every year. Santa Clarita Valley International Charter School has recognized Chiquita Canyon Landfill as a donor for the last six years, and over that same period of time, the landfill offered CalArts students annual scholarships based on a judged gallery show in which all of the art must be constructed from trash from the landfill.

    Source link: https://la.curbed.com/2017/9/27/16351910/val-verde-landfill-eureka-villa-history-california

  13. Kathy G says:

    Yes we have to many people, traffic. They put the homes so close, you can reach out your bathroom window and borrow the paper from your neighbor.. how much traffic is enough.. remember in the 94 quake how long it took to get to the valley.. took my husband over three hours to go from Saugus to Lassen and desoto.. I wonder do you city planners even think about any of this?. Going to fine me if m neighbor above me over waters and the water comes down the hill and out my drain?? You claim drought?.. but build more homes???? Really all about the MONEY??? Doesn’t matter !!!! more people fleeing California then staying!!! Then where are you going to ge your tax money from?? You know when I first moved to Santa Clarita in the late 80 early 90s this place was great, and safe.. Now people stealing and breaking the windows of your car , walking around trying door knobs , stealing Mail… walking into the store and not paying !!!! AND YOU THINK MORE HOMES IS GOING TO MAKE IT BETTER????????????
    No more people are needed,,,.

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