header image

[Sign Up Now] to Receive Our FREE Daily SCVTV-SCVNews Digest by E-Mail

Inside
Weather
Santa Clarita CA
Mostly sunny
Mostly sunny
55°F
 
Calendar
Today in
S.C.V. History
May 23
1941 - SCV's first real movie house, the American Theater, dedicated in Newhall [story]
American Theater


A 15-year-old plan to build close to 500 homes between Shadow Pines and Agua Dulce was approved unanimously by county supervisors Tuesday provided the developer includes 14 green conditions that promise to transform the plan into a state-of-the-art project in terms of sustainability.

The revamped Spring Canyon housing project, which calls for 495 homes now, includes solar panels for those homes, charging stations for electric vehicles, gray water recycling for lawns and solar heating for a community pool if such a pool is ever built.

“No project is static,” county Supervisor Kathryn Barger said before reading a long list of environment-friendly conditions.

“But (in the past 15 years), a lot has changed,” she said at the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors meeting Tuesday, reflecting back to when the housing project was first approved in 2004.

Barger thanked Spring Canyon applicant Patrick Parker of Raintree Investment for having worked with SCV environmentalists and having arrived at “increased environmental protections.”

She also thanked Lynne Plambeck, president of Santa Clarita Organization for Planning and the Environment, or SCOPE, which filed a formal appeal of the decision made by regional planners to approve the Spring Canyon project.

“It’s admirable that both sides worked through the issues,” Barger said. “Thank you, Lynne Plambeck, for making this project better.”

‘Fabulously amended’

Barger then listed the climate-change amendments, prompting Supervisor Janice Hahn to call it “fabulously amended.”

Conditions include:

* Each home is to be built with a solar panel system that would generate the equivalent of 3 kilowatt-hours of electricity.

* Creating 25 public-use charging stations for electric vehicles.

* The garage of each home is to have a built-in, 220-volt outlet for future electric vehicle chargers.

* If a community pool is ever built in Spring Canyon, it is to be heated by solar panels.

* Each home is to have a tankless on-demand water heater.

* Each home is to comply with current ordinances and state laws, including low impact and water conservation laws.

* Pervious pavement, which allows rainwater to recharge the groundwater, is to be used in the parking lots of the park. Impervious pavement is to be eliminated where possible.

* Each home is to come with plumbing that would accommodate an optional gray water system to recycle washing machine or kitchen sink water waste for use in backyard landscaping. Gray water is wastewater generated by washing people and their clothes. It comes from washing machines, sinks, shower stalls and baths. It does not come from toilets. Toilet wastewater is dubbed “black water,” and must be disposed of in sewer systems or septic tanks.

* Each home is to come with a rainwater collection system to reduce landscape water use.

* The landscaping of parks, common space areas and the front yards of each home is to comply with ordinances and state laws that call for drip irrigation of drought-tolerant landscaping.

* At the request of the county biologist, the applicant for Spring Canyon is to plant locally native vegetation in the open space and on slopes as long as it is 50 feet from structures.

* All new home sales offices for the Spring Canyon project are to be stocked with brochures highlighting the benefits of the green initiatives featured in Spring Canyon and with brochures from National Wildlife that inform homebuyers about the Backyard Habitat program. The Backyard Habitat program preserves pockets of land in its natural state, allowing native vegetation to thrive and wildlife to move about freely.

* At the request of the county biologist and SCOPE, the applicant agrees to plant eight holly leaf cherry trees for every one removed. The new holly leaf cherries are to be planted in the open space of the project.

* Also at the request of the county biologist, the applicant is to come up with a map of all existing holly leaf cherry trees on the property and indicate which ones will be impacted by the housing project. A map is also to be prepared showing where and how many impacts are to be made and the location of new plants in open space.

Plambeck thanked Parker and Chris Perry, the planning deputy for Los Angeles County’s 5th District, because “they worked very well with us,” she said.

SCOPE
“It took us all the way to appealing to the Board of Supervisors, but we are pleased to say that although there was no climate chapter in this because the (environmental impact report) was so old, there are accommodations now that match other (sustainable) projects in areas like Northlake and Newhall Ranch,” Plambeck said.

Likewise, Parker thanked Barger’s staff, and his SCOPE critics, saying: “We’ve worked with SCOPE to talk about Spring Canyon.

“This is an amendment to a project that was previously approved and we’re excited to move forward. There are many public benefits and we also think the project is better now,” he said.

The planned Spring Canyon housing development is north of Highway 14 and Soledad Canyon Road, between Shadow Pines Boulevard and Agua Dulce Canyon Road.

It calls for one Los Angeles County Fire Department station and one Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department substation to be built, two parking lots and three open space lots, all on nearly 550 acres.

* * * * *

SCOPE issued the following statement Wednesday:

“Urban sprawl is never the answer, and the Spring Canyon project at the outskirts of the Santa Clarita Valley is no exception. The impacts of this project to our community in the form of additional traffic, and to the natural world through reduction of this major wildlife corridor and two tributaries to the Santa Clara river is substantial. But we tried to work with the developer to make it better.

“We know that some of the energy and water saving mitigations that we were promised for this project will be required anyway by state law, so we take no credit for having them included now. Those changes were due to the hard work of our state legislators last year and would have hopefully been required anyway.

“But we were concerned that the developer might somehow be able to grandfather in this 19- year- old project without complying with current building codes and we wanted to try to get better baseline biological studies and mitigation for the loss of part of the rare cherry woodland.

“This much did get accomplished. It took time-consuming attendance at public hearings and substantial costs for filing appeals to the Planning Commission and the Board of Supervisors.

“During the process we also requested that the Board of Supervisors require the Planning Department to bring CEQA addendums to the Planning Commission so that the community can be fully informed of proposed changes, and that really old projects like this be required to provide updates on traffic, water supply and climate change or other affected parts of their Environmental Impact Reports.

“Many thanks to the SCOPE team that worked on this project including Sally White and Nathan Bousfield, and to Cher Gilmore from Citizen’s Climate Lobby for attending the Supervisors’ meeting to speak on climate change, and to all our members and others who wrote letters of concern to the county about this project.”

Comment On This Story
COMMENT POLICY: We welcome comments from individuals and businesses. All comments are moderated. Comments are subject to rejection if they are vulgar, combative, or in poor taste.
REAL NAMES ONLY: All posters must use their real individual or business name. This applies equally to Twitter account holders who use a nickname.

2 Comments

  1. Tree lover says:

    Thank you SCOPE for all your work on this and other projects that you have worked. Your never ending watchful-eyes have helped many projects in our community not be “terrible.” Keep up the good work. Sad that all those (500) holly leaf cherry trees have to be cut. The wild flowers there this year are amazing, too. SAD that that will be graded over…..

  2. waterwatcher says:

    After the baseline study of the holly leaf cherries requested by the County biologist, it seems that 270 of the over 500 will be cut. This is surely a loss, but at least not a complete loss. They will be replaced by a ratio of 8 to one in the open space areas of the project, according to the approval.

Leave a Comment


SCV NewsBreak
LOCAL NEWS HEADLINES
Sunday, May 22, 2022
May 24: City Council Meets to Authorize Garbage Collection Fee Increase
The Santa Clarita City Council will hold a regular meeting Tuesday, May 24, beginning with a special/closed session at 5 p.m., followed immediately by open session at 6 p.m.
Friday, May 20, 2022
May 22: Vigil of Prayer and Lament for a Hurting World at St. Stephen’s
Feeling the need to act, members of the Santa Clarita Human Relations Roundtable, St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, Congregation Beth Shalom, NAACP Santa Clarita, Higher Vision Church and the Islamic Center of Santa Clarita Valley decided to gather with community members to mark and reflect on the May 14 shooting in Buffalo, N.Y.
Friday, May 20, 2022
Friday COVID Roundup: L.A. County Public Transit Masking Requirement is Extended
The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health confirmed 10 new deaths throughout L.A. County and 3,180 new cases countywide.
Keep Up With Our Facebook

Latest Additions to SCVNews.com
1941 - SCV's first real movie house, the American Theater, dedicated in Newhall [story]
American Theater
The Santa Clarita City Council will hold a regular meeting Tuesday, May 24, beginning with a special/closed session at 5 p.m., followed immediately by open session at 6 p.m.
May 24: City Council Meets to Authorize Garbage Collection Fee Increase
1865 - Discoverer Ramon Perea and partner sell Pico Canyon oil claim to Edward Beale & Robert Baker for $300 [story]
grave marker
1978 - St. Francis Dam site becomes a State Landmark [story]
state landmark dedication
With school ending and summer break just around the corner, the Santa Clarita Public Library has everything you need to keep your family busy and engaged with reading, crafts and outdoor programs.
Read Beyond the Beaten Path This Summer
Feeling the need to act, members of the Santa Clarita Human Relations Roundtable, St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, Congregation Beth Shalom, NAACP Santa Clarita, Higher Vision Church and the Islamic Center of Santa Clarita Valley decided to gather with community members to mark and reflect on the May 14 shooting in Buffalo, N.Y.
May 22: Vigil of Prayer and Lament for a Hurting World at St. Stephen’s
The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health confirmed 10 new deaths throughout L.A. County and 3,180 new cases countywide.
Friday COVID Roundup: L.A. County Public Transit Masking Requirement is Extended
Los Angeles County Department of Public Health is working with state and national partners on an international outbreak of monkeypox. On May 19 the Centers for Disease Control confirmed a case of monkeypox in the United States in Massachusetts.
L.A. County Public Health Reports International Outbreak of Monkeypox
The father/son legacy continues after 40 years at Valley Institute of Prosthetics and Orthotics established in 1982. The company serves the Central Valley and the Santa Clarita Valley with the highest quality orthotic and prosthetic devices for patients to regain functionality.
VIPO Prosthetic and Orthotic Company Celebrates 40 Years
The County of Los Angeles Department of Animal Care and Control is aware of the public’s desire to visit our animal care centers without an appointment. In response Animal Care and Control is adopting new public visitation hours for unscheduled visits just in time for National Pet Adoption Weekend, May 20-22.
Castaic Animal Care Center Offers Walk-in Visits in Time for National Adoption Weekend
Join the fun this summer and sign up for a class at Los Angeles county Parks. Don’t miss out on this unique opportunity to learn something new, make new friends and discover new talents.
May 30: In-person, Virtual Summer Classes Begin at L.A. County Parks
In my early 20s I worked on a sheep farm in southern Illinois. The farm had about 1,000 sheep and two Great Pyrenees dogs to protect them.
Marcia Mayeda | Does Your Dog Act Its Breed?
The California Air Resources Board will host an open house of its new state-of-the-art “green” Southern California Headquarters, the Mary D. Nichols Campus, in Riverside on Saturday, May 21.
May 21: California Air Resources Hosts Open House for New SoCal Headquarters
College of the Canyons had three Women's Softball players spotlighted by the California Community College Fastpitch Coaches Association with Ashlynn Heck, Allyson Melgar and Lisa Motz selected to the All-Southern California Team.
Cougars Softball Heck, Melgar, Motz Earn All-Southern California Honors
Los Angeles County is hosting the first in-person Homeowners' Resource Fair for the public since the pandemic hit two years ago. The event will be held Saturday, May 21 9 a.m. to noon at the Huntington Park Community Center, 6925 Salt Lake Ave., Huntington Park, CA 90255.
May 21: 2022 L.A. County Homeowners’ Resource Fair
1946 - Cher, great-granddaughter of Placerita Canyon homesteader Frank Walker and onetime Placerita property owner, born in El Centro, Calif. [story]
Cher and grandma
The California Interscholastic Federation Southern Section announced its All-Foothill League teams representing the Santa Clarita Valley.
All CIF-SS Foothill League Spring Sports Teams Announced
Free business training webinars are available from the College of the Canyons Small Business Development Corporation. The SBDC is the Small Business Administration's largest service program and provides high quality business and economic development assistance to small businesses and entrepreneurs. It provides no-cost business advising and low-cost training to existing and new businesses.
May 25: COC SBDC Hosting Free Webinars to Help Grow Your Business
The city of Santa Clarita has released a list of arts-related events happening in the Santa Clarita Valley.
Santa Clarita Arts Calendar: Civic Art RFQ, Call for Textile Fiber Art, more
Charlotte Kaup Kleeman, 1996 Santa Clarita Valley Woman of the Year, died Thursday, May 19, 2022 in Valencia. She was 85.
Longtime Community Leader Charlotte Kleeman Dies at 85
After a more than a two-year wait, the Free to Be Me Music Festival will make its much-anticipated debut at the Canyon Country Community Center, located at 18410 Sierra Highway, on Sunday, June 12, from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m.
City’s Long-Awaited ‘Free to Be Me’ Music Festival Debuting June 12
The 37th Women in Service Celebration was hosted by the Zonta Club of Santa Clarita Valley on Saturday, May 14. The event honored 19 women who have worked tirelessly to improve the lives of women and girls in the SCV. The honorees were nominated by SCV nonprofits.
Zonta SCV Names Alison Lindemann Recipient of Carmen Sarro Award
The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health confirmed Thursday nine additional deaths and 4,725 new positive cases countywide, with 164 new cases in the Santa Clarita Valley.
Thursday COVID Roundup: 164 New SCV Cases, 4,725 New Cases Countywide
The Fil-Am Association of Santa Clarita Valley will host the "A Black Tie Gala" on July 23 at 7 p.m. at the Hyatt Regency Valencia, located at 24500 Town Center Drive.
July 23: SCV Fil-Am Association Hosts Black Tie Gala
SCVNews.com
%d bloggers like this: