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S.C.V. History
July 24
1864 - Walker/Reynier family patriarch Jean Joseph Reynier, then 15, arrives in Sand Canyon from France; eventually homesteads 1,200 acres [story]
Joseph Reynier


The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health on Thursday confirmed 1,051 new cases of COVID-19 and 36 new deaths due to the virus countywide and a total of 2,818 confirmed COVID-19 cases in the Santa Clarita Valley since the pandemic began, 25 more than reported Wednesday.

In the SCV, of the 27 people who have died of the virus to date, 21 resided in the city of Santa Clarita, 2 in Acton, 1 in Castaic, 1 in unincorporated Valencia, 1 in unincorporated Bouquet Canyon, and 1 in a community not yet named.

Countywide, Public Health has reported 78,227 positive cases of COVID-19 and a total of 3,027 deaths to date. Ninety-four percent of people who died had underlying health conditions.

Statewide, the California Department of Public Health has reported a total of 161,099 confirmed cases and 5,290 deaths from COVID-19. Currently, there are 3,439 confirmed hospitalizations and 1,119 ICU hospitalizations.

California’s positivity rate – a key indicator of community spread – remains stable in the 14-day average. Hospitalization rates remain stable over the long-term while showing a slight uptick in the 14-day average. Please note, numbers may not represent true day-over-day change as reporting of test results can be delayed. There were 4,084 new confirmed cases Wednesday. More than half of new cases were reported from Los Angeles County, with 600 results coming in from an earlier period. There have been 3,074,530 tests conducted in California. As testing capacity continues to increase across the state, an increase in the number of positive cases has been expected – increasing the importance of positivity rates to find signs of community spread.

Health Care Worker Infection Rates
As of June 17, local health departments have reported 12,685 confirmed positive cases in health care workers and 78 deaths statewide.

Santa Clarita Valley Thursday Update

Of the 2,818 cases reported to Public Health for the SCV to date, the community breakdown is as follows:

City of Santa Clarita: 930

Castaic: 1,724 (includes Pitchess Detention Center and North County Correctional Facility*)

Stevenson Ranch: 43

Canyon Country (unincorporated portion): 39

Val Verde: 23

Acton: 18

Valencia (unincorporated portion west of I-5): 12

Agua Dulce: 18

Saugus (unincorporated portion): 5

Elizabeth Lake: 3

Bouquet Canyon: 1

Lake Hughes: 1

Newhall (Unincorporated portion): 1

*Note: The county is unable to break out separate numbers for Castaic and PDC/NCCF because the county uses geotagging software that cannot be changed at this time, according to officials. Click here for the LASD COVID-19 dashboard.

Henry Mayo Thursday Update
Henry Mayo Newhall Hospital reported its 13th COVID-related death on Wednesday, June 17, according to hospital spokesman Patrick Moody.

As of Wednesday, of the 2,343 persons tested at Henry Mayo to date, 249 tested positive, 2,328 were negative, 77 were pending and 7 patients were hospitalized in a dedicated unit receiving ICU-level care. A total of 94 COVID-19 patients have been discharged so far.

Discrepancies in the testing numbers are due to some patients being tested more than once, Moody said.

The hospital is now releasing numbers on a weekly basis (Wednesdays) unless there is a drastic change in the number of cases or a death has been confirmed, he said.

L.A. County COVID-19 Cases

L.A. County COVID-19L.A. County Demographics
Twenty-six people who died were over the age of 65 years old, seven people who died were between the ages of 41 and 65 years old, and one person who died was between the ages of 18 and 40 years old. Thirty-one people had underlying health conditions including 25 people over the age of 65 years old and six people between the ages of 41 to 65 years old. One death was reported by the City of Long Beach and one death was reported by the city of Pasadena.

Of those who died, information about race and ethnicity is available for 2,807 people (99 percent of the cases reported by Public Health); 42% of deaths occurred among Latino/Latinx residents, 29% among White residents, 17% among Asian residents, 11% among African American residents, less than 1% among Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander residents and 1% among residents identifying with other races. Upon further investigation, 13 cases reported earlier were not L.A. County residents. There are 1,429 people who are currently hospitalized, 29% of these people are in the ICU and 22% are on ventilators. Testing capacity continues to increase in L.A. County, with testing results available for nearly 868,000 individuals and 8% of people testing positive.

A modified Health Officer Order and directives for the reopening of additional businesses is being issued Thursday with an effective date of June 19.

The Health Officer Order will allow for the following sectors to reopen once they implement the required protocols for infection control and distancing:

– Cardrooms, satellite wagering facilities and racetracks with no spectators

– Personal care services including: esthetician, skin care and cosmetology services; electrology; nail salons; body art professionals, tattoo parlors, microblading and permanent make-up; and piercing shops; and massage therapy

– Bars, wineries, breweries and tasting rooms

The Health Officer Order contains protocols for all businesses that are permitted to reopen to ensure it is done as safely as possible for employees, customers and residents. Employees and visitors to these businesses will need to wear a cloth face covering when around other people and practice physical distancing of at least 6 feet at all times. Some employees may be required to wear face shields. It is important for everyone to follow the directives and to do their part every day to keep everyone as safe as possible. Businesses should take the time to put all of the protocols in place before reopening. The directives will be available online and are contained in sector-specific protocols that inform all re-openings.

“To the many families who are mourning loved ones lost to COVID-19, please accept our heartfelt sympathies,” said Barbara Ferrer, PhD, MPH, MEd, Director of Public Health. “COVID-19 has impacted everyone across the county, and we are all feeling exhausted by the safety requirements, yet we still have to find it within ourselves to do our part to protect each other from the spread of the virus. As more sectors re-open, we risk losing all the progress we have made in slowing the spread, if we don’t take every precaution possible to prevent exposing others and ourselves to the virus.”

Because this virus is still easily transmitted among people in contact with each other, the best protection against COVID-19 continues to be to wash your hands frequently, avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands, self-isolate if you are sick, practice physical distancing, and wear a clean face covering when in contact with others from outside your household. It’s important if someone thinks they could be positive for COVID-19 and are awaiting testing results, to stay at home and act as if they are positive. This means self-isolating for 10 days and 72 hours after symptoms and fever subside, or until they receive a negative result. If a person tests positive for COVID-19, they should plan on receiving a call from a contact tracer to discuss how to protect themselves and others, to find out where they may have been, and who they were in close contact with while infectious. People who have underlying health conditions remain at much greater risk for serious illness from COVID-19, so it will continue to be very important for the County’s vulnerable residents to stay at home as much as possible, to have groceries and medicine delivered, and to call their providers immediately if they have even mild symptoms.

The Reopening Protocols, COVID-19 Surveillance Interactive Dashboard, Roadmap to Recovery, Recovery Dashboard, and additional things you can do to protect yourself, your family and your community are on the Public Health website, www.publichealth.lacounty.gov.

California Thursday
As testing capacity continues to increase across the state, the California Department of Public Health is working to expand access to COVID-19 testing. Testing should be used for medical evaluation of persons with symptoms of COVID-19 as well as for efforts by public health agencies and essential employers to prevent and control the spread of COVID-19. Individuals prioritized for testing include:

– Hospitalized patients

– Symptomatic and asymptomatic healthcare workers, first responders, and other social service employees

– Symptomatic individuals age 65 and older or symptomatic individuals of any age with chronic medical conditions that increase the risk of severe COVID-19 illness

– Individuals who are tested as part of disease control efforts in high-risk settings

– Asymptomatic residents and employees of congregate living facilities when needed to prevent disease transmission

– Symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals in essential occupations such as grocery store and food supply workers, utility workers and public employees

– Other individuals with symptoms consistent with COVID-19

As of June 17, there have been 3,074,530 tests conducted in California and reported to the California Department of Public Health. This represents an increase of 76,542 tests over the prior 24-hour reporting period.

These numbers include data from commercial, private and academic labs, including Quest, LabCorp, Kaiser, University of California and Stanford, and the the 25 state and county health labs currently testing.

Racial Demographics – A More Complete Picture
The California Department of Public Health is committed to health equity and collecting more detailed racial and ethnic data that will provide additional understanding for determining future action. Health outcomes are affected by forces including structural racism, poverty and the disproportionate prevalence of underlying conditions such as asthma and heart disease among Latinos and African American Californians. Only by looking at the full picture can we understand how to ensure the best outcomes for all Californians.

The differences in health outcomes related to COVID-19 are most stark in COVID-19 deaths. We have nearly complete data on race and ethnicity for COVID-19 deaths, and we are seeing the following trends. Overall, for adults 18 and older, Latinos, African Americans and Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders are dying at disproportionately higher levels. The proportion of COVID-19 deaths in African Americans is about double their population representation across all adult age categories. For Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders, overall numbers are low, but about three-fold difference between the proportion of COVID-19 deaths and their population representation. More males are dying from COVID-19 than females, in line with national trends. More information is available at COVID-19 Race and Ethnicity Data.

New Data Portal
The state has launched a new, user-friendly data portal at COVID-19 Statewide Update that tracks COVID-19 cases statewide and by county, gender, age and ethnicity. The portal also outlines statewide hospitalizations and testing efforts. The data presented on the portal will be updated daily and will include additional information as it is available.

Your Actions Save Lives
Every person has a role to play. Protecting yourself and your family comes down to common sense:

– Staying home except for essential needs/activities following local and state public health guidelines when patronizing approved businesses. To the extent that such sectors are re-opened, Californians may leave their homes to work at, patronize, or otherwise engage with those businesses, establishments or activities.

– Practicing social distancing.

– Wearing a cloth face mask when out in public.

– Washing hands with soap and water for a minimum of 20 seconds.

– Avoiding touching eyes, nose or mouth with unwashed hands.

– Covering a cough or sneeze with your sleeve, or disposable tissue. Wash your hands afterward.

– Avoiding close contact with people who are sick.

– Staying away from work, school or other people if you become sick with respiratory symptoms like fever and cough.

– Following guidance from public health officials.

Always check with trusted sources for the latest accurate information about novel coronavirus:

Los Angeles County Department of Public Health

California Department of Public Health

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Spanish

World Health Organization

L.A. County residents can also call 2-1-1.

What to Do if You Think You’re Sick
Call ahead: If you are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 (fever, cough or shortness of breath), call your health care provider before seeking medical care so that appropriate precautions can be taken. More than 85 community testing sites also offer free, confidential testing: Find a COVID-19 Testing Site.

For more information about what Californians can do to prevent the spread of COVID-19, visit Coronavirus (COVID-19) in California.

California continues to issue guidance on preparing and protecting California from COVID-19. Consolidated guidance is available on the California Department of Public Health’s Guidance webpage.

Comment On This Story
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2 Comments

  1. Henry Mayo testing numbers dont add up right…….

    • SCVNews.com says:

      from the report: “Discrepancies in the testing numbers are due to some patients being tested more than once, Moody said.”

Leave a Comment


SCV NewsBreak
LOCAL NEWS HEADLINES
Friday, Jul 23, 2021
Atkins Delays Resigning from SCV Water Board
Santa Clarita Valley Water Agency board member BJ Atkins told The Signal Thursday he has delayed his plan to resign from the board, due to construction delays on a house he is building outside of the agency’s jurisdiction.
Friday, Jul 23, 2021
Cleanup of Whittaker-Bermite Land Completed, Land Remains Up in the Air
As the cleanup of close to 1,000 acres of contaminated soil and water at Whittaker-Bermite comes to a close, and while lawyers in bankruptcy court hundreds of miles from the site slice through litigation so that one day stores or homes can be built there, the land itself is reverting to the way it was long before the dynamite makers made a mess of it, where the deer — if not the antelope — and other critters play, marking a robust return of wildlife.
Friday, Jul 23, 2021
Friday COVID-19 Roundup: County Reports Over 3,000 New COVID-19 Cases for First Time Since February 13; Henry Mayo Reports Highest Hospitalizations since March
On Friday, Los Angeles County Public Health officials confirmed seven new deaths and 3,058 new cases of COVID-19, marking the third day in a row with more than 2,500 cases reported in a day.
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