header image

[Sign Up Now] to Receive Our FREE Daily SCVTV-SCVNews Digest by E-Mail

Inside
Weather
Santa Clarita CA
Cloudy
Cloudy
43°F
 
Calendar
Today in
S.C.V. History
January 27
1970 - Gov. Ronald Reagan appoints Adrian Adams as Newhall's first "second" judge [story]
Adrian Adams


| Friday, Dec 4, 2020
pew
Photo: Johns Hopkins University.

 

As a vaccine for COVID-19 edges closer, 60% of Americans say they will take it when it becomes available but a full 21% say they will not, the Pew Research Center reported Thursday.

When Pew last polled Americans on the topic in September, only 51% said they would get the vaccine. Meanwhile, a Gallup poll from August found that 35% of Americans were not planning to get the vaccine even if it was free and approved by the Food and Drug Administration.

In the new survey, 52% of those not planning to get the vaccine say they are not too concerned about the possibility of contracting COVID-19 and requiring hospitalization. For those who were “very concerned,” 74% rated their vaccination plans as probable or definite.

More than half of the population (54%) reported having known someone personally who has been hospitalized or died from the virus, yet still, a large segment of the population (47%) reported that they are “not at all concerned” about getting a serious case of COVID-19.

Among Black Americans, 71% said they know someone who has been hospitalized or died, and just 42% said they will get a vaccine.

Confidence is up for not only getting the vaccine but also that the U.S. will be able to produce a safe and effective vaccine, with 75% saying they have a “great deal” of confidence in the process. That is up from 65% in the September study.

This confidence is starkly contrasted, however, between those who will not get the vaccine and those who will. For those desiring vaccination, 88% say they have a great deal of confidence in the research and development process, compared with 80% of those not interested in the vaccine who have no confidence at all.

pew

Though more Americans feel confident that the vaccine will be safe, only 37% say they are comfortable being among the first to get it.

Paulo Verardi, an associate professor of virology and vaccinology at the University of Connecticut, called the study promising as it will be important for a large sector of the population to get the vaccine.

“To attain herd immunity, it’s expected that at least two-thirds of the population, if not more, would need to be immune against Covid-19,” Verardi said in an email. “The fact that 60% of Americans now say that they would get a Covid-19 vaccine is very encouraging, and I predict that this number will be even higher as vaccines start being distributed and administered. If enough people don’t get vaccinated, the virus and its negative consequences for all of us will linger.”

As COVID-19 cases surge across the country, the study revealed that 71% of Americans feel the worst is yet to come. Further, about half say that they fear their local hospitals will not be able to handle it.

A full 49% of Americans said they were very bothered about being around people not wearing masks in public, and 72% said they are not bothered by mask requirements in stores and businesses.

Notably, 87% say they wear a mask most of the time in stores or businesses, which is up from 65% from a June Pew study.

The study also found that more Americans feel comfortable going to the grocery store than attending a crowded party. Specifically, 88% of those who do not worry about getting the virus feel comfortable going to the store, but only 27% feel comfortable going to a party.

pew

There is a partisan view that hospitals have done an excellent job responding to the virus, but Democrats and Republicans vastly disagree on how President Donald Trump has handled it, with 67% of Republicans saying he has done an excellent job and only 7% of Democrats say the same.

Trump’s overall approval rating for his handling of the virus is 35%, according to the study, down from 48% in a March Pew study.

The United Kingdom authorized the Pfizer-BioNtech vaccine for emergency use on Wednesday. The U.S. is still waiting for the Food and Drug Administration to finish its review process prior to approval.

The study surveyed 12,648 adults from Nov. 18 to Nov. 29.

— By Emilee Larkin, CNS

Comment On This Story
COMMENT POLICY: We welcome comments from individuals and businesses. All comments are moderated. Comments are subject to rejection if they are vulgar, combative, or in poor taste.
REAL NAMES ONLY: All posters must use their real individual or business name. This applies equally to Twitter account holders who use a nickname.

0 Comments

You can be the first one to leave a comment.

Leave a Comment


SCV NewsBreak
LOCAL NEWS HEADLINES
Tuesday, Jan 26, 2021
L.A. County COVID-19 One Year Later: 15,592 Deaths; 1,085,044 Total Cases
One year ago (Tuesday), the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health announced its first case of the novel coronavirus.
Tuesday, Jan 26, 2021
Confusion on Second Dose Scheduling Prompts County Officials to Offer Clarity
With COVID-19 vaccine appointments booked at Los Angeles County sites through the end of the week, Public Health officials assured those who received their first dose are guaranteed their second — but confusion over the scheduling process prompted officials to clarify the situation Tuesday.
Tuesday, Jan 26, 2021
Newhall’s Pioneer Oil Refinery Recognized as Historic Site
Built in the 19th century, the Pioneer Oil Refinery in Newhall played a pivotal role in the early development of the Santa Clarita Valley.
Keep Up With Our Facebook

Latest Additions to SCVNews.com
1970 - Gov. Ronald Reagan appoints Adrian Adams as Newhall's first "second" judge [story]
Adrian Adams
Zonta Club of Santa Clarita Valley took part in the “Zonta Says NO to Violence Against Women” campaign from Nov. 25 - Dec. 10, 2020.
Zonta Club’s 16 Days of Activism Receives Proclamation from City
One year ago (Tuesday), the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health announced its first case of the novel coronavirus.
L.A. County COVID-19 One Year Later: 15,592 Deaths; 1,085,044 Total Cases
With COVID-19 vaccine appointments booked at Los Angeles County sites through the end of the week, Public Health officials assured those who received their first dose are guaranteed their second — but confusion over the scheduling process prompted officials to clarify the situation Tuesday.
Confusion on Second Dose Scheduling Prompts County Officials to Offer Clarity
CBRE announced the sale of Sierra Crest Center, a neighborhood retail and office center in Santa Clarita, to a joint venture group for $9.9 million.
Sierra Crest Retail Center Sold for $9.9 Million
Built in the 19th century, the Pioneer Oil Refinery in Newhall played a pivotal role in the early development of the Santa Clarita Valley.
Newhall’s Pioneer Oil Refinery Recognized as Historic Site
The Santa Clarita Community College District Board of Trustees will hold a video/teleconferencing special meeting via Zoom on Wednesday, Jan. 27, beginning with a closed session at 4:00 p.m., followed immediately by open session at 5:00 p.m.
Jan. 27: Santa Clarita Community College District Virtual Special Meeting
Five Point Holdings, LLC recently announced the sale of additional homesites at its Valencia community, previously known as Newhall Ranch, and the lineup of homebuilders for the first phase of the community.
Five Point Holdings Sells Nearly 500 New Homesites in Valencia
As COVID-19 vaccination continues for health care workers and those over 65, Gov. Gavin Newsom announced Monday California is looking to prioritize the next phases of vaccination efforts by age, rather than occupation.
California May Switch to Age-Based COVID-19 Vaccination System
Tejon Ranch Co. declared victory for its 8,000-acre Grapevine mixed-use development after a Kern County Superior Court judge ruled against an Arizona-based environmental group that dubbed the project “damaging.”
Judge Rules Against Environmentalists Over Grapevine Development
In 2019, Valencia High School student, Pedro Roman, was diagnosed with Leukemia. After one long and hard-fought year, Roman is now in remission due to the success of his latest treatment.
Jan. 30: Community Blood Drive for Valencia High’s Pedro Roman
1990 - "Duplicates" premieres at L.A. Phil; concerto by CalArts Music School dean Mel Powell wins Pulitzer Prize [story]
Mel Powell
California Public Health officials lifted the regional Stay at Home Order statewide on Monday as Los Angeles County Public Health officials confirmed 43 new deaths and 6,642 new cases of confirmed COVID-19 countywide, and Henry Mayo Newhall Hospital in Valencia reported five new deaths on Saturday and Monday.
Monday COVID-19 Roundup; 5 New Deaths at Henry Mayo as State Lifts Stay-at-Home Order
Los Angeles County is set to align its health order with California's by the end of the week, as the state lifted its regional stay-at-home order statewide Monday, green-lighting the reopening of in-person outside dining and hair and nail salons, among other businesses.
L.A. County to Align with State, Lift ‘Safer at Home’ Order by End of Week
Officials with the California Department of Public Health on Monday ordered the Regional Stay at Home Order lifted for all regions statewide, including the three regions that had still been under the order – San Joaquin Valley, Bay Area, and Southern California.
California Stay At Home Order Lifted for All Regions Including SoCal
As another winter storm hit the Santa Clarita Valley and surrounding areas, Interstate 5 was shut down through the Grapevine in "Operation Snowflake" Monday morning, with some lanes reopened by Monday afternoon.
‘Operation Snowflake’: CHP, Caltrans Reopen Grapevine Amid Snowstorm
Because of the recent rainfall, Los Angeles County Health Officer Muntu Davis, MD, MPH, is cautioning residents about beach water use due to bacteria, chemicals, debris, trash, and other public health hazards from city streets and mountain areas that are likely to contaminate ocean waters at and around discharging storm drains, creeks, and rivers.
L.A. County Urges Caution for Beach Water Use Through Wednesday
A series of projects brought forth by Santa Clarita Valley-based organizations and agencies to aid the local homeless population could soon receive thousands of dollars from the city of Santa Clarita.
Santa Clarita Could Grant $126K to 6 Projects to Aid SCV Homeless Population
Citing the case of a convicted child rapist, Los Angeles County Supervisor Kathryn Barger said Friday she’s concerned there is a growing trend that the rights of victims of some of the most violent crimes are not being protected under District Attorney George Gascón’s administration.
Barger Steps in to Deny Parole to Convicted Child Rapist
Medical examiners with the Los Angeles County Coroner’s Office identified Benjamin Marquez IV, 31, of Castaic, as the man killed in a solo-vehicle crash that left one dead and sent another to the hospital Saturday.
Benjamin Marquez of Castaic ID’d as Man Killed in Rollover Crash
1915 - Death of pre-Mentry oilman & San Francisquito vintner Ramon Perea [story]
Perea grave marker
1888 - Acton post office established; Richard E. Nickel, postmaster [story]
postal cover
1882 - Author Helen Hunt Jackson visits Rancho Camulos; inspiration for "Ramona" novel [story]
HH Jackson
The COVID-19 crisis has trashed recycling efforts and instead generated an increase in plastic waste, according to a recent study, but Los Angeles County restaurants could soon be required to make adjustments related to disposable food ware in an effort to reduce waste.
Jan. 26: Board of Supervisors to Consider Restaurant Requirement Aimed at Curbing Waste
%d bloggers like this: