[Sign Up Now] to Receive Our FREE Daily SCVTV-SCVNews Digest by E-Mail

Inside
Weather
Santa Clarita CA
Sunny
Sunny
88°F
 
Calendar
Today in
S.C.V. History
July 7
1919 - Mike Shuman, Placerita Junior High School principal, born in Fitchburg, Mass. [story]


| Saturday, Jun 6, 2020
michel moore
Los Angeles Police Department Chief Michel Moore speaks with faith leaders and community members on the issues of racism and police violence during a vigil outside police headquarters on Friday. (Courthouse News photo / Martin Macias, Jr.)

 

LOS ANGELES – At a community vigil Friday, Los Angeles Police Chief Michel Moore, a Santa Clarita Valley resident, characterized police brutality and racism as viruses, but thousands of protesters who swarmed the vigil challenged the lack of accountability for officers who attacked peaceful protesters.

Massive demonstrations demanding an end to police violence and the defunding of police departments continued across California this week.

The protests in L.A. County and across the nation were set off by the killing of George Floyd at the hands of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin.

Police departments nationwide have been criticized for using excessive force against peaceful protesters and detaining them in conditions that make them more vulnerable to COVID-19 infection.

The National Lawyers Guild sued the L.A. Police Department on Friday alleging excessive force and civil rights violations committed against protesters, including claims of being detained without access to bathrooms or medical attention.

The federal class-action lawsuit, filed on behalf of Black Lives Matter-L.A. and L.A. Community Action Network, seeks damages and both declaratory and injunctive relief for thousands of protesters who were injured by officers.

“Over the course of the last several decades, [L.A.] has been sued repeatedly for many of the same tactics on display the past week, including kittling protesters before declaring an unlawful assembly, excessive force with batons and rubber bullets, and prolonged handcuffing and improper conditions of confinement for arrestees,” stated the 25-page lawsuit (see bottom of story).

Outside L.A. Police Department headquarters, Moore gathered with interfaith leaders and community residents next to a painting of Floyd who he described as a kind giant and a resource to his community.

Moore said Floyd’s killing exposed the long history of state violence in the country and renewed longstanding calls for reform.

“It tore at the very heart of what policing is, tore at the very essence of our duty to serve and to protect,” said Moore, who was selected as LAPD chief by city Mayor Eric Garcetti in June 2018.

Faith leaders and community representatives described the vigil as a space for police officers to express their grief over Floyd’s murder and discuss solutions.

“As we reflect on continued acts of racism, what arises is the pain, the exhaustion, the heartbreak. I feel it and I hope you feel it too,” said L.A. resident Jonathan Franklin. “I also see small glimpses of change. Nobody is free until we all are free. We are L.A. and we are in this together.”

Moore described racism and police violence as viruses that the black community is dealing with amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

“It’s been a virus that has stayed with us for generations,” Moore said. “More than anything, I hope for an antidote to racism, to social injustice. Racism is not inherited, it’s not in your genes.”

“We repeat what we don’t repair” was the tagline of the vigil, which also called on participants to embrace “open minds, open hearts, responsible dialogue,” according to an event flyer.

The massive crowd of protesters chanted loudly at barricades outside LAPD headquarters, drowning out speakers at the vigil who were flanked by a line of police and National Guard.

Moore came under heavy criticism this week for saying people engaged in looting were as much to blame for Floyd’s death as the former Minneapolis police officers who killed him.

“We didn’t have people mourning the death of this man, George Floyd, we had people capitalizing,” Moore said in a press conference Monday alongside L.A. Mayor Eric Garcetti. “His death is on their hands as much as it is those officers.”

Moore immediately apologized during the press conference and later issued a statement on Twitter clarifying his remark.

“While I did immediately correct myself, I recognize that my initial words were terribly offensive,” Moore tweeted. “Looting is wrong, but it is not the equivalent of murder and I did not mean to equate the two.”

Garcetti issued a statement on the comment after the joint press conference, saying Moore misspoke.

“The responsibility for George Floyd’s death rests solely with the police officers involved,” Garcetti tweeted. “Chief Moore regrets the words he chose this evening and has clarified them.”

Earlier on Friday, Black Lives Matter-L.A. organized an event titled #RoseFromConcrete outside the Hall of Justice which houses L.A. County District Attorney Jackie Lacey’s office.

Lacey has been a frequent target of criticism from BLM and other community organizations who decry her refusal to criminally charge officers who kill civilians.

This year, Lacey has been forced into a runoff election in November against former San Francisco DA George Gascon, who was endorsed Thursday by Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders.

The BLM event invited residents to lay a rose on the steps of the Hall of Justice to commemorate people killed by police.

The Los Angeles Police Protective League, a labor union representing over 9,000 LAPD officers, said Friday it opposes Garcetti’s mandate for close to $150 million in police department budget cuts and his comments chiding police behavior during protests.

“We’ve sent an emergency request to Chief Moore to send the LAPD Crisis Response Team to City Hall because Eric has apparently lost his damn mind,” the union said in a statement.

Multiple videos have surfaced on social media this week showing LAPD officers striking peaceful protesters with batons, shooting pepper balls at protesters walking away from police and shooting pedestrians in the head with rubber bullets.

Garcetti said this week he will limit the LAPD’s use of rubber bullets and require officers to intervene when they witness misconduct.

California Governor Gavin Newsom announced Friday he will pursue a statewide standard for crowd control tactics and use of force policy for police assigned to respond to public protests.

“Protesters have the right to protest peacefully – not be harassed,” Newsom said in a statement on Twitter. “Not be shot at by rubber bullets or tear gas.”

Newsom also directed the California Commission on Peace Officer Training to ban police from using a chokehold – also called the carotid hold – to subdue people.

L.A. County Supervisor Janice Hahn said Friday she will promote county support for a bill by state Assemblyman Mike Gibson, D-Los Angeles, which would ban police from using chokeholds across California.

L.A. County Supervisor Sheila Kuehl introduced a motion Thursday requiring police to explain how they will arrest, detain and process protesters in a way that prevents exposure to COVID-19.

“During the protests in Los Angeles over the last few days, not all law enforcement personnel were equipped with personal protective equipment,” Kuehl said in a statement Thursday. “Protestors were detained without face masks and were not always able to maintain physical distancing. We must develop health policies and practices that reduce the risk of infection when people are exercising their First Amendment rights.”

— By Martin Macias Jr.

See the 25-page lawsuit below:

[Open .pdf in new window]

Comment On This Story
COMMENT POLICY: We welcome comments from individuals and businesses. All comments are moderated. Comments are subject to rejection if they are vulgar, combative, or in poor taste.
REAL NAMES ONLY: All posters must use their real individual or business name. This applies equally to Twitter account holders who use a nickname.

0 Comments

You can be the first one to leave a comment.

Leave a Comment


LOS ANGELES COUNTY HEADLINES
Monday, Jul 6, 2020
Another resident of the city of Santa Clarita has died due to COVID-19, the city's 26th fatality and the 33rd in the Santa Clarita Valley to date, according to the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health.
Monday, Jul 6, 2020
Smoke from the Soledad Fire burning near Agua Dulce has caused unhealthy air quality in the Santa Clarita Valley and the San Gabriel Mountains, sparking a smoke advisory from Los Angeles County Public Health officials.
Monday, Jul 6, 2020
After improving the data processing systems, which resulted in no data being reported since Thursday, July 2, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health on Sunday reported an increase of 7,232 new cases for Thursday, Friday and Saturday.
Friday, Jul 3, 2020
Park officials have announced Los Angeles County regional parks and natural areas, which include William S. Hart Park, Placerita Nature Center and Vasquez Rocks, will now be closed Mondays and Tuesdays due to staffing reductions.
Friday, Jul 3, 2020
As the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health suspends daily reports until Monday, the California Department of Public Health on Friday confirmed a total of 248,235 cases statewide as of July 2 (up from 5,688 from July 1 and another 2,352 results received), with 6,263 deaths (up 100 from July 1) from the disease.

Keep Up With Our Facebook
Latest Additions to SCVNews.com
A lone medallion – a sleek, black circle adorned with the city of Santa Clarita logo in gold – lies in hiding, waiting to be found by a lucky person in one of the City’s 35 parks.
Residents Invited to City’s Medallion Hunt
The fast-spreading brush fire that burned nearly 1,498 acres in Agua Dulce reached 68% containment by Tuesday morning, with firefighters still in the area scouting for potential flare-ups, according to Los Angeles County Fire Department officials.
Soledad Fire at 68% Containment, Firefighters Monitoring Hot Spots
1919 - Mike Shuman, Placerita Junior High School principal, born in Fitchburg, Mass. [story]
The city of Santa Clarita's Film Office has reported three productions now shooting in the Santa Clarita Valley:
Now Shooting in SCV: ‘Eden’ TV Show, 2 Still Photoshoots
Another resident of the city of Santa Clarita has died due to COVID-19, the city's 26th fatality and the 33rd in the Santa Clarita Valley to date, according to the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health.
Monday COVID-19 Roundup: 33rd SCV Resident Dies; New Cases Surge in 18-40 Demo
Air quality will be unhealthy for sensitive groups and individuals in the Santa Clarita Valley on Tuesday, July 7, according to the latest South Coast Air Quality Management District forecast.
Tuesday SCV Air Quality: Unhealthy for Sensitive People
After breaking a daily coronavirus testing record over the July 4 holiday weekend, California Governor Gavin Newsom on Monday said hospitalizations remain alarmingly high as COVID-19 continues to spread throughout the state’s largest counties.
Newsom Reports Spike in California COVID Hospitalizations, Patients in ICU
Caltrans is adopting a set of new, high-priority actions to improve access to walking, bicycling and transit options throughout California.
Caltrans Adopts Action Plan to Increase Walking, Bicycling Statewide
A brush fire dubbed the Soledad Fire burned more than 1,000 acres and shut down Highway 14 Sunday, and as of 9 a.m. Monday was 30% contained, according to Los Angeles County Fire Chief Deputy David R. Richardson Jr.
Soledad Fire in Agua Dulce Burns 1,500 Acres, 48% Contained
Smoke from the Soledad Fire burning near Agua Dulce has caused unhealthy air quality in the Santa Clarita Valley and the San Gabriel Mountains, sparking a smoke advisory from Los Angeles County Public Health officials.
Soledad Fire Prompts Smoke Advisory for SCV, Local Mountains
As firefighters worked through the night battling the Soledad Fire in Agua Dulce, a second blaze, named the Cambria Fire, was reported Monday morning in nearby Placerita Canyon.
Cambria Fire Scorches 5 Acres in Placerita Canyon
The city of Santa Clarita has canceled the 2020 Concerts in the Park series due to the ongoing coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and in accordance with the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health’s Safer at Home order.
Santa Clarita Cancels Concerts in the Park Summer Series
After improving the data processing systems, which resulted in no data being reported since Thursday, July 2, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health on Sunday reported an increase of 7,232 new cases for Thursday, Friday and Saturday.
L.A. County Reports 7,232 New COVID-19 Cases After 3 Days of Data Upgrades
1850 - Town founder Henry Mayo Newhall arrives in California to look for gold [story]
Henry Newhall
1914 - Rev. Wolcott H. Evans, the future "pastor of the disaster," named pastor of Newhall's First Presbyterian Church [story]
church
1932 - Robert Poore wins the greased pole climbing contest and $2.50 at Newhall's July 4th celebration [story]
4th of July Parade
Park officials have announced Los Angeles County regional parks and natural areas, which include William S. Hart Park, Placerita Nature Center and Vasquez Rocks, will now be closed Mondays and Tuesdays due to staffing reductions.
SCV Regional Parks, Natural Areas Reduce Operating Hours
As the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health suspends daily reports until Monday, the California Department of Public Health on Friday confirmed a total of 248,235 cases statewide as of July 2 (up from 5,688 from July 1 and another 2,352 results received), with 6,263 deaths (up 100 from July 1) from the disease.
Friday COVID-19 Roundup: Cases, Hospitalizations, Deaths Rise Statewide
The Old Town Newhall Library will exhibit works by Santa Clarita artists created during "The Quarantine Art Challenge" from July 14 to October 9.
‘Quarantine Art Challenge’ Exhibit to Open at Newhall Library July 14
The Committee for College of the Canyons — Yes on Measure E has been ordered to pay a $9,000 fine for infractions committed in 2016 and 2017.
Committee for College of the Canyons Bond Measure Ordered to Pay $9K Fine
The Los Angeles County Department of Public Social Services has launched a new website to provide county residents with general program information on DPSS services.
L.A. County Launches New Website for Public Social Services Dept.
At the direction of the Department of Public Health, all Los Angeles County beaches will be closed this weekend, resulting in the closure of all lifeguard towers.
Beaches in L.A., Ventura Counties to Close for Holiday Weekend
Air quality will be unhealthy for sensitive individuals in the Santa Clarita Valley on Saturday, July 4, according to the latest South Coast Air Quality Management District forecast.
July 4 Air Quality: Unhealthy in SCV for Sensitive People (and Pets)
The city of Santa Clarita has changed the language of its Code Enforcement’s mission statement -- by omitting a portion stating that issues are addressed using the "broken windows" theory -- to reflect what officials said is a more accurate reflection of operations.
City Changes Code Enforcement Mission Statement Regarding ‘Broken Windows’ Theory
%d bloggers like this: