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Vicinity map (Click to enlarge)

Vicinity map (Click to enlarge)

Construction is a few years away, but the privately owned “open space” between Valencia-Westridge and Six Flags Magic Mountain will be giving way to 1,574 homes and 730,000 square feet of commercial buildings developed by The Newhall Land and Farming Co.

The draft environmental impact report, in the works for the past five years, was published April 30, and the public has 60 days (until June 29) to review it. The county’s Regional Planning Department has scheduled a public hearing for June 4 at 6 p.m. at Rancho Pico Junior High School.

Called Entrada South, the planned development project is located outside of Santa Clarita city limits in unincorporated Los Angeles County west of Interstate 5. It’s actually part of Newhall Land’s original Valencia Master Plan – not Newhall Ranch – as is Entrada North, which will bring a new Town Center-type development just north of it between Magic Mountain and Interstate 5. (Westridge is also part of Valencia. Stevenson Ranch is a separate area to the south.)

From a practical standpoint, the two Entrada projects will seem like components of the (additional) 20,000-home Newhall Ranch development, which will abut them on the west.

With 7.8 million cubic yards of cut-and-fill grading, Entrada South will completely change the landscape.

Built on 382.3 acres with an additional 119.1 acres of off-site development (mostly borrow sites for grading), 399 single-family homes will be erected on 4,500- to 6,050-square-foot lots on the south side of the property, closest to Westridge. In the middle will be 1,235 two-, 3- and 4-story condominiums. At the north, next to the amusement park, will be 435,000 square feet of office space and 295,000 square feet of retail.

Elementary school site (Click to enlarge)

Elementary school site (Click to enlarge)

Entrada South will generate something on the order of 5,000 new residents.

As for schools, Newhall Land has developer fee agreements with the Saugus, Newhall and Hart school districts. Included in Entrada South is an elementary school in the Saugus Union School District, built and paid for by Newhall Land on a 9.4-acre piece of property the company will donate to the district.

High school students will attend existing and/or future Hart District schools. The draft EIR anticipates boundary adjustments among West Ranch, Valencia and Castaic high schools:

“Total student enrollment in the Hart District for the 2013-2014 school year was 21,160, or 91 percent of total student capacity. In order to accommodate existing and future students, the Hart District has approved and is constructing the new Castaic High School. … The design capacity of Castaic High School will be 2,600 students, and the boundaries encompassing West Ranch High School, Valencia High School and Castaic High School will be realigned once Castaic High School opens.”

Land use map (Click to enlarge)

Land use map (Click to enlarge)

The latest guesstimate for the opening of Castaic High School is 2019, which could roughly coincide with the development of Entrada South. The typical housing development process entails approval by the county Regional Planning Commission, followed by approval from the L.A. County Board of Supervisors several months later. Then it would be tied up in litigation for another couple of years.

The draft EIR contemplates that construction would start in 2018, and the homes “may be built out in phases or all at once.” Build-out is expected by 2024.

Water would come from the Valencia Water Co., and plans call for recycled water to be used for landscaping. The project includes a 5.6-acre neighborhood park.

As for biological resources, Entrada South is included in the approved Newhall Ranch Resource Management and Development Plan and Spineflower Conservation Plan, which went through a separate environmental review process. Within Entrada South, 27.2 acres at the southeast corner of the development area are set aside for the San Fernando Valley spineflower, which is a state-listed endangered species and a candidate for federal designation.

Sixty-seven oak trees would be removed, including three heritage oaks.

Off-site development includes improvements to portions of Magic Mountain Parkway, Media Center Drive and Commerce Center Drive, and an extension of Westridge Parkway.

 

All project documents are available [here].

 

(Click to enlarge)

(Click to enlarge)

Excerpt from the Executive Summary (DEIR Chapter 2):

(1) Residential Component

The Project includes a total of 1,574 residential units. This includes 339 single- family detached units and 1,235 multi-family units. The single-family housing type reflects a traditional lot orientation and together with the multi-family units provides for an overall residential density of just under 5.0 dwelling units per acre averaged over the southerly residential portion of the site. The multi-family units are typically characterized as condominium (attached and detached), duplex, triplex, townhome, and condominium/ apartment-style buildings.

(2) Commercial Component

The Project’s proposed commercial areas would include retail/commercial and office uses connected to the surrounding residential and commercial uses by vehicular, transit, and pedestrian networks that include streets, trails, a pedestrian bridge, courtyards, and other outdoor features. A total of 730,000 square feet of commercial uses are planned within VTTM 53295. Of this total, approximately 435,000 square feet are anticipated to be office uses, with the remaining 295,000 square feet anticipated to be commercial retail uses.

(3) Elementary School

The Project Applicant has entered into School Facilities Funding Agreements with Saugus Union School District and Newhall School District that require, among other things, the construction of an elementary school within the Project Site. Accordingly, the Project includes construction of a centrally-located elementary school on a 9.4-acre site. The school would be connected with the surrounding residential areas through trails and paseos that would provide pedestrian and bicycle access.

(4) Park and Recreation Areas

A 5.6-acre public neighborhood park would be developed within VTTM 53295 immediately east of the elementary school. Two separate private neighborhood recreation centers also are planned on a total of 2.9 acres within the Project Site. Additionally, smaller recreation areas would be located throughout the multi-family planning areas within VTTM 53295.

(5) Spineflower Preserve

The Project includes a 27.2-acre Spineflower Preserve located within the southeastern portion of the Project Site. The boundaries of the Spineflower Preserve have been delineated in consultation with the County and California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW), and have been configured to ensure the continued existence of the San Fernando Valley spineflower (Chorizanthe parryi ssp. fernandina; spineflower) in perpetuity. The Project Applicant is responsible for the funding and implementation of management activities, including monitoring, as approved by the County, CDFW, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps), and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). The Spineflower Preserve was approved in conjunction with the Applicant’s Newhall Ranch Resource Management and Development Plan and Spineflower Conservation Plan (RMDP/SCP project).

(6) Community Trails, Paseos, Recreational Trails, and Bike Lanes

The Project would provide an extensive community trail system throughout the Project Site, which would be linked to the Newhall Ranch Specific Plan trail system to the west and the existing community of Westridge to the south. The Project includes a total of 7,240 linear feet of community trails, 10,980 linear feet of paseos, 13,740 linear feet of recreational trails, and 8,090 linear feet of bike lanes. The Project also includes a pedestrian bridge extending across Magic Mountain Parkway which would be integrated into the trail network.

(7) Site Access and Circulation

Regional access to the Project Site would be provided by I-5 to the east and State Route 126 (SR-126) to the north. Magic Mountain Parkway would be the primary east/west roadway through the Project Site. The Project includes a circulation system of arterials, residential collectors, and private drives. Additionally, Magic Mountain Parkway and Westridge Parkway would be extended to provide regional access to and from the Project Site’s western boundary to I-5 and Valencia Boulevard, respectively.

(8) Drainage, Flood Control, and Water Quality Improvements

The Project would meet the ongoing requirements of all National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits by providing drainage, flood control, and water quality improvements, such as storm drains, debris basins, water quality basins, and inlet and outlet structures. Project Design Features (PDFs) incorporated into the Project to address water quality and hydrologic impacts include site design, source control, treatment control, and hydromodification control Best Management Practices (BMPs). To reduce debris discharged through and from the Project Site, 12 debris basins are proposed at the downstream ends of natural areas to intercept flows from undeveloped upland areas prior to their discharge into the on-site storm system. On-site surface runoff would be intercepted by curb inlets, debris and/or desilting basins and conveyed to a network of storm drains that would lead to a series of treatment facilities, including water quality basins, prior to discharge into existing drains that outlet to the Santa Clara River. In particular, a water quality basin would be constructed adjacent to the Santa Clara River to carry runoff from portions of the Project Site and immediately surrounding area. In commercial areas, parking lot and roof runoff would be directed to landscaped parkways or to sections of porous pavement to provide infiltration and initial treatment prior to discharge into the drainage system.

(9) Potable Water System

The Project’s potable water system consists of a network of water lines, water tanks, booster pumps, and pressure reducing valves. Water storage for the Project would be provided by a proposed 4.0-million-gallon reservoir tank to be constructed on an existing tank site pad located adjacent to Westridge Parkway to the south of VTTM 53295. This water tank would be located adjacent to an existing 4.0-million-gallon water tank. The Valencia Water Company (VWC) would provide potable water to the Project.

(10) Recycled Water System

Currently, recycled water in the Project vicinity is available from the Valencia Water Reclamation Plant (WRP) located along The Old Road north of the Project Site. The Project would use recycled water for landscape irrigation purposes through connections to a separate recycled water storage and distribution system. Existing recycled water lines within Magic Mountain Parkway and Westridge Parkway would be extended to serve the Project. In addition, booster pumps and/or pressure reducing valves would be provided to connect the four pressure zones within the Project Site and to provide service within the different zones.

(11) Wastewater System

The Project’s wastewater needs would be served by the Santa Clarita Valley Sanitation District (SCVSD), which is part of the County Sanitation Districts of Los Angeles County (LACSD), and would be treated at the Valencia WRP. The Project’s wastewater plan consists of a system of gravity sewers that connect to a proposed extension of the LACSD trunk sewer line in Magic Mountain Parkway, which would be maintained by LACSD. The sewer lines within the Project Site would be designed and constructed for maintenance by LACDPW.

(12) Grading

Project grading, including that required for the External Map Improvements, would require the removal and recompaction of approximately 7.8 million cubic yards of existing material in a balanced cut and fill operation.2 Grading would include mass grading for the development areas, along with fine grading for development pads. Mass grading would consist of rough grading operations that would provide for major roads and infrastructure, including improvements outside of VTTM 53295 (i.e., the External Map Improvements), establish drainage patterns, and create building pads for the various land uses within the Project Site. In addition to mass grading and fine grading, remedial grading of approximately 2.0 million cubic yards of material may also be required depending upon site-specific soils and future geotechnical investigations. Specifically, remedial grading may be required for alluvial removal and re-compaction; landslide conditions; stabilization fills; slope wash conditions (i.e., unsuitable soils that need to be removed and recompacted prior to the placement of fill materials); and lot and street over-excavation in cut areas. Graded slopes would be landscaped and irrigated pursuant to County grading and erosion control requirements. Recycled water from the Valencia WRP would be delivered to meet the Project’s grading and erosion control requirements.

(13) Shared Improvements

Some of the proposed External Map Improvements in the western portions of the Project Site also fall within the boundaries of the Newhall Ranch Specific Plan’s approved Mission Village development, and many of these improvements, particularly infrastructure improvements, were previously approved as part of and would support development at Mission Village. Should one project be built before the other, the first project would have the obligation to construct these shared improvements. In particular, should Mission Village be developed first (which may be likely given its approved status), a number of improvements would be constructed pursuant to the Mission Village approval and would no longer be undertaken as part of Entrada South. Refer to Section 3.0, Project Description, of this Draft EIR for further discussion.

(14) Sustainability

The Project would comply with the County’s Green Building Standards Code (County Code, Title 31), which addresses sustainability via appropriate planning and design, water and energy efficiency and conservation, waste diversion, and tree planting requirements, as well as the County’s Low Impact Development (LID) Standards (County Code, Title 12, Chapter 12.84) related to stormwater handling and treatment to protect streams, groundwater, surface water quality, and natural drainage characteristics. The Project also would implement sustainability principles, including an appropriate mix of land uses, access to transit, the preservation of natural areas, water and energy conservation features, and green building techniques.

(15) Economic Characteristics

Based on 2010 U.S. Census data for the existing community of Stevenson Ranch to the south, the average size of a housing unit is 3.36 persons per household.3 Therefore, based on the proposed Project’s construction of 1,574 housing units, the residential component of the Project would result in an estimated population increase of 5,288 persons. In addition, an estimated 2,679 jobs are anticipated to be created by the Project.

(16) Project Entitlements

As discussed in more detail in Section 3.0, Project Description, of this Draft EIR, the Project would require approval of the following entitlements:

* Vesting Tentative Tract Map No. 53295.    The proposed tract map would subdivide 382.3 acres of the Project Site into a total of 500 lots.

* Zone Change No. 00-210 to change existing R-1 zoning within VTTM 53295 to RPD-5000-5.8U, C-2, and C-3.

* Conditional Use Permit No. 00-210 to authorize: (1) grading within the Project Site in excess of 100,000 cubic yards; (2) implementation of the Residential Planned Development (RPD) zoning classification; (3) development in a hillside management (HM) area; (4) construction of an off-site water tank; and (5) reduction of minimum lot area from 5,000 square feet to a minimum of 4,500 square feet on the lesser of 16 single-family lots or five percent of single- family lots.

* Oak Tree Permit No. 200700018 to authorize impacts to oak trees. The Oak Tree Permit would be required for the removal of up to 67 oak trees, including 3 heritage oaks, and encroachment    on up to 11 oak trees, including 1 heritage oak.

* Parking Permit No. 200700013 to authorize shared and reciprocal parking across lot lines.

 

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163 Comments

  1. Chris Taylor Chris Taylor says:

    Building more homes is silly. The infastructure needs to be updated to ease traffic. The city is doing everything ass backwards.

  2. S.d. Guillen S.d. Guillen says:

    Like 1 single house more is what’s really needed in the Santa Clarita Valley……they won’t be satisfied until there isn’t a single patch of land that doesn’t have a house sitting on it. It’s both sad and ridiculous.

    • Well, that might be true, but that is the plan that has been on the books since the 1960s, before most folks moved here. Hopefully everyone knew what they were getting into. :)

    • S.d. Guillen S.d. Guillen says:

      The ” Master Plan ” of Ol’ Newhall Land & Farm…

    • S.d. Guillen S.d. Guillen says:

      And the reason for building thousands of homes in the Santa Clara river bed that I witnessed overflow it’s banks back in 1977…but hey…all in the name of progress right…?

    • SD – if life is so hard for you here in Santa Clarita, I’m sure there’s a nice place in sylmar or pacoima for you to lay your head.

      Heck – I’ll even help you pack!

    • S.d. Guillen S.d. Guillen says:

      Long time resident, left and returned but trust me I will be gone before the end of the year. This valley is but a glimmer of what it once was. Thanks for the offer Anthony, not needed….

    • S.d. Guillen S.d. Guillen says:

      And it’s nothing about life being hard here, it’s the sadness when I see what it’s become.

    • Just because it has been in the books since 1960 doesn’t mean its a good idea now. I’m sure a few things
      have changed since then.

    • S.d. Guillen S.d. Guillen says:

      Exactly George. I’m sure they didn’t “plan ” for the overcrowding and the sheer number of vehicles on the streets…but hey…they can always re- widen and add more lanes to Bouquet I suppose….

    • Anthony Fierro your rudeness and sarcasm isn’t necessary. I know your sweet mother raised you better then that.

    • Don Teller Don Teller says:

      I have my house so we don’t need more attitude is to common.

    • Jim Oge Jr Jim Oge Jr says:

      You have prof that it was set in stone in the 1960 it was maybe laughed about but not drawn up then.

    • John Gilbert John Gilbert says:

      The NL&F master plan started with Valencia being a planned community, and everything they have built since follows what was initiated in 1968. Statewide, they are converting thier farm and ranching operations to sowing homes, shopping centers, and industrial parks. When the City of Santa Clarita was trying to voted in in ’86, because of all the building going on, the City was sold to us as “Controlled Growth”. But, Like the High Speed Rail, it was a situation of polling people to see what they would “buy” (vote on) and then “bait ‘n switch”. so that NL&F controlled the growth.

  3. Just what this valley needs, more traffic! Ugh!!!

  4. That’s all that Santa Clarita is, just a sea of concrete.

  5. Derek Derek Derek Derek says:

    Wow right next to the park that seems like a bad idea

  6. we need to stop over populating this city, no water, no space, too much traffic, crime increasing, enough is enough.

  7. Jayme Aliano Jayme Aliano says:

    Why can’t they just leave it as open space? :(

  8. Westridge and SR residents fought the Brine Waste dev. Not sure how we can impact this, but I can guarantee that meeting on June 4th will be filled with pissed off residents. NHLF is aware there’s a serious drought right? This is idiotic.

  9. Dana Deuson Dana Deuson says:

    Are they planning on building another High School and middle school too?

  10. Have you all been outside this valley? We don’t have half the congestion and traffic that most of LA has. Let’s hope they are all
    Smart homes with drought tolerant yards and water and energy systems. Make them desirable for upgrades. Growth will come, we can hope the type of change will be for the better.

  11. Stop wasting our water

  12. Screw NL&F . They suck and have sucked the life out of this valley. I hate you!!!

  13. 5 year moratorium people! At the least!

  14. Ed De Rueda Ed De Rueda says:

    I hope they are building their own lake to hold their water…………..

  15. Michael Pare Michael Pare says:

    It’s going to suck living here. Time to consider moving, this is turning into the valley. I see crime going up,prosperity taxes going up, quality of life going down. Santa Clarita is not the nice friendly little town it used to be.

  16. A.j. Gardner A.j. Gardner says:

    Will the children in those homes attend the already overcrowded schools for this area?

  17. Not just no, hell no!!!!

  18. The answers to the questions people are asking (schools, etc.) are in the story … follow the link

  19. Yes lori. I live here and work in West Los Angeles. I go to SFV all the time too. Traffic bites here. Some intersections, it takes a couple of lights to get through the intersection. Yesterday after fighting all the traffic I got back on the 5 to only come to a dead stop. Actually the SFV traffic is better because there are more ways to get to one place than in the SCV. There are more streets to cut down when in traffic in the SFV.

  20. How wonderful! Quit asking us to conserve water. Leave the little land We have left alone!

  21. Ryan Osborne Ryan Osborne says:

    Where is all the water coming from??? We do not need these homes out here!!!

  22. Barb Green Barb Green says:

    Build those houses and watch how fast they complain about noise from the amusement park.

  23. Chelsea Finkelson I think this is what we were talking about last weekend

  24. And here you all thought we were in a drought!?!? ;-)

  25. Wow! Think the streets and stores in Santa Clarita are crowded now? Wait til this next series of projects occurs ….

  26. Bob Dixon Bob Dixon says:

    “This is not in the city”
    L.A. County area people !!!!

    Wait till they build Newhall on the 126 / Ventura /LA border ….

    • Noooooooooooo……
      I think NL&F has plans to build all the way to Ventura county line. Suppose to have stores, schools, a fire department. …
      Oh yeah…lookin forward to the congestion. …NOOOOTTTT!!!

    • It’s not the city til it’s build then they annex it. Been here since 66, and so far they’ve planned well, built schools etc. But the water problem doesn’t have answers nor the freeways. Go figure!

    • Rosary Hibbard says:

      It does not matter if it is not the city who has all of these lovely plans of building more homes etc. It still affects the SCV surrounding areas. So you can say that it is not the city’s plans but it will still wreak havoc on the area as a whole. It is sad how that whole area has changed and has virtually become L.A.

      • waterwatcher says:

        I hope everyone that is unhappy with this will show up at the hearing on June 4th 5PM Rancho Pico Jr High and object to it for all the reasons stated here. A large turn out is important. Bring your friends!

  27. Maybe they should build homes that people want. And not homes with outrageous lot premiums and no yards. What ever happened to a nice home with a yard for your kids to play. Capitalism at its best. All house no land all money for newhall land the builders they want to squeeze every dollar out of the consumer. Here we go with more traffic on our freeways as well.

  28. Al Nichols Al Nichols says:

    The good thing is that these homes will be selling at a big discount!!! Due to lack of water they will have no indoor plumbing!!! A self composting out house will be available starting at $5K.

  29. Alan Difatta Alan Difatta says:

    These comments are hilarious. It’s not in the city and has been planned for many years. When did you move here? Guess only you’re allowed and after that no one. I was here in 62. Should have shut the gates so all you Nimbys couldn’t come and post your ridiculous posts.

  30. 8 billion more cars on the 5 fwy. How many new freeways are they going to build? How about a new sports stadium instead. And water, oh who needs that?

  31. But wait …. there’s more to come!

  32. John Gilbert John Gilbert says:

    The NL&F master plan started with Valencia being a planned community, and everything they have built since follows what was initiated in 1968. Statewide, they are converting thier farm and ranching operations to sowing homes, shopping centers, and industrial parks, and corralling people instead of cattle (Not much difference). When the City of Santa Clarita was trying to voted in in ’86, because of all the building going on, the City was sold to us as “Controlled Growth”. But, Like the High Speed Rail, it was a situation of polling people to see what they would “buy” (vote on) and then “bait ‘n switch”. so that NL&F controlled the growth.

  33. Water shortage? Build more houses?

  34. Water shortage? Build more houses?

  35. The county and cities will let you build all you want regardless of the water issue if there’s money to be made

  36. The county and cities will let you build all you want regardless of the water issue if there’s money to be made

  37. Abe Pash Abe Pash says:

    Matt Sreden that’s why I live in my side. It’s funny that these are people who live and work in this city. They’re like omg it’s going to take me an extra 10 min to get to my job at LAZY DOG.

  38. Abe Pash Abe Pash says:

    Matt Sreden that’s why I live in my side. It’s funny that these are people who live and work in this city. They’re like omg it’s going to take me an extra 10 min to get to my job at LAZY DOG.

  39. Santa clarita city making alot of money they don’t think for the residents they selling lands for companies to make more houses santa clarita is now like san fernando valley over population they destroying this beautiful city

  40. Santa clarita city making alot of money they don’t think for the residents they selling lands for companies to make more houses santa clarita is now like san fernando valley over population they destroying this beautiful city

  41. Joe Powell Joe Powell says:

    I don’t care about the houses… Just don’t give them any water!!!!

  42. Joe Powell Joe Powell says:

    I don’t care about the houses… Just don’t give them any water!!!!

  43. well, these 1,500 homes are just one small component of about 25,000 more homes to come west of I-5.

  44. well, these 1,500 homes are just one small component of about 25,000 more homes to come west of I-5.

  45. Hell, I remember when there was no Valencia!!

  46. Hell, I remember when there was no Valencia!!

  47. Pete Giebler Pete Giebler says:

    No no.. the 1500 is part of the 25,000 overall. Not that it makes much difference.

  48. Thank you for the correction sir. Hahahahahaha.

  49. Who is supplying the water to all those homes ? California is in a major drought..

  50. What Water Shortage ???? !!!!

  51. What Water Shortage ???? !!!!

  52. Arizona lookin better n better these days….ijs

  53. Jeff Smestad Jeff Smestad says:

    Mega Mello Roos & Hoa!!!

  54. Where is the water going to come from?

  55. Nic Miller Nic Miller says:

    At least u sensed my sarcasm lol

  56. Born n raised here since 68…..I remember cutting across fields to get to a friends house. ..now look at those lots….

  57. Dana Deuson Dana Deuson says:

    Ok they are building school to support these homes, but they were building Castaic High School 8 years ago, and it still hasnt been built and the classrooms are over filled in surrounding communities, sad about losing those Heritage trees too…

  58. Come to Colorado, you can be my neighbor!

  59. Tessa Lucero says:

    And how many of the residents of this new county community are going to drive across the freeway and park in the park & ride at the transit center? How many of them will head for the train stations and park there? How many of their kids will be expecting to ride SCT buses to school since Hart District stopped busing most of the students some years ago? I don’t see any mention of public transit in the story. The park & ride lots and Metrolink parking lots are already straining to accomodate transit riders.

  60. Joy Martinez Joy Martinez says:

    This is sad. Escaping Overcrowding in other areas is why most of us decided to come here. But here it is. If this is a planned community. Why are we letting this happen?

  61. So tell me again why I need to cut back my water use by 25%. Doesn’t make any sense that all existing residents need to cut back water use or face some pretty hefty fines while thousands of new water users are added to the grid! Time for a state-wide building moritorium if you ask me!

    • Uh, what, the same state govt that calls for X number of new low- and moderate-income homes to be built each year? The state and the county govts are pro-growth.

      • Carole Lutness says:

        Leon, The operative words are “low and moderate” income homes. And SCV doesn’t know that the definition of “Low and Moderate” is “Extremely low” (new buildings = none) Very low (new buildings = none) Low (what a computer tech or starting teacher earns) (buildings = few) and Moderate (firemen, police, etc) (buildings = few) We need housing for extremely and very low income people but developers don’t want to build them because they don’t make much money off of them and this community doesn’t want to provide incentives to the developers. And what low income housing that does get built has been for elderly buildings. Hence we have hundreds of homeless Santa Clarita kids attending school out here; disabled people living on the edge (try living on $900 a month SSI) and scores of fast-food workers and other $9 hr jobs, etc. living hand to mouth. SCV doesn’t want the poor out here. Plenty of million dollar homes but ne’er to none for low income folks. As Bob Kellar famously said (twice) in print, “we don’t want “THEM” living with the NICE people of Santa Clarita!” (referring to our homeless)

        • SCVNews.com says:

          Hi Carole! Don’t know why you’re addressing this to me (Leon), but I’m not seeing a question here. Were you just stating the obvious? No argument from me. Nobody wants to build ultra-low, especially in California, and especially in SCV, when the first $75,000 to $100,000 is fees & taxes & years of litigation costs when the developer is sued right out of the box.

          • Carole Lutness says:

            Leon, there are CA communities that do make sure that the very poor in their communities have safe, affordable housing (like HUD/Sec8). At the very least, SCV should be really helping Family Promises/the Shelter, get their Transitional Housing program going.

          • SCVNews.com says:

            Those things will all happen as we grow. Meantime, it would be wrong to imply we don’t have several HUD housing projects, because we do, including some in Valencia. As for ultra-low next to Westridge, however… can you imagine? Even if the numbers worked (which they don’t), the neighbors would scream bloody murder!

  62. Sandra Coco Sandra Coco says:

    I don’t need that extra people in this city.

  63. This valley was ruined in 1980 at least!

  64. Jack Winkel Jack Winkel says:

    Where is the water gonna’ come from?

  65. IRene Betsch IRene Betsch says:

    Where they gonna get their water?

  66. And they’ll all be using the 5 Freeway.

  67. Jimmy Guzman Jimmy Guzman says:

    In eight years more SCV will look like Van Nuys. Just watch the people at the mall. They do not resemble that looked about 8 years ago :-(

  68. Jimmy Guzman Jimmy Guzman says:

    In eight years more SCV will look like Van Nuys. Just watch the people at the mall. They do not resemble that looked about 8 years ago :-(

  69. Jimmy Guzman Jimmy Guzman says:

    In eight years more SCV will look like Van Nuys. Just watch the people at the mall. They do not resemble that looked about 8 years ago :-(

  70. Thom says:

    I’m just curious as to how many of you are actually adding to the problem. As long as you continue to make more people, there has to be more places for them to live. The Bible says to re-produce, not pollute. Over-population is the core to most of today’s problems. More people means the need for more houses; more cars; more oil/gas; more jobs; more water; and leads to more trash; more pollution; more crime. Over population has led to less of what we want and need and more of what we don’t, and the way it’s going, it’s only going to continue to get worse.

  71. Sara Jones says:

    You all are a bunch of morons. Thank you for making me laugh this morning.

  72. waterwatcher says:

    Hey – did anyone notice all the oil pads on this property? Yes, this is a closed oil field. The area is supposedly cleaned up, but what will happen after the grading. AND, you know you won’t own the mineral rights under your home. So technically someone could come in and slant drill and frack right under your house. Don’t think that could happen? You should watch “Gasland” I or II. Its a nightmare waiting to happen here. They are already fracking in Placerita Canyon.

    Now is your chance, residents! Hearing – June 4th 6PM Rancho Pico Junior High. Everyone that has been complaining about new development while we have to cut back should show up at this hearing. Numbers are important.

    It’s not just these 1574 units there’s the 21,000 additional houses in Newhall Ranch and the other 15,000 houses proposed around the valley. We have to start saying no! No other place is subjected to this kind of massive development. We don’t have the water supply to support it no matter how much we cut back. We are all being asked to lose our trees, our parks and everything else that keeps our public areas cool in the heat so that there is water for tens of thousands of additional houses in the SCV or almonds and alfalfa that is exported to China. That’s not right.

    Whenever asked, Dan Masnada, head of CLWA, has repeatedly stated that there is plenty of water for new houses in Santa Clarita. If we are all being asked to allow our trees to die, that statement has to be a lie.

    We DO have a water problem in California. A look at empty reservoirs is enough to make anyone worried. Wells in the upper Santa Clara River watershed are dry, but thousands of new housing units are still moving forward. New vineyards in Aqua Dulce pump water while neighboring wells go dry. What is going on here? Will no public official stand up and say there needs to be a moratorium on new development until we see if this drought is the “new normal”? We can’t continue to build urban sprawl housing and add thousands of new lawns and swimming pools if there is no water.

    Existing residents should have some rights in all of this. Time to start speaking up, folks. Landuse planning matters.

  73. Jack Winkel Jack Winkel says:

    SCVTV, you sound like politicians, it’s out of our control!!!

  74. Ken Griffin Ken Griffin says:

    Really? Where is the water going to come from?

  75. Ken Griffin Ken Griffin says:

    Really? Where is the water going to come from?

  76. Jim Lupold Jim Lupold says:

    Without a plan to incrementally increase jobs (at all levels from labor to executive) in SCV that can support this growth, it is irresponsible to continue building homes at the current rate.

  77. Jim Lupold Jim Lupold says:

    Without a plan to incrementally increase jobs (at all levels from labor to executive) in SCV that can support this growth, it is irresponsible to continue building homes at the current rate.

  78. Betty Deleon says:

    I moved to Canyon Country in 1990. I loved the peacefulness, the open spaces, lack of malls, and the small town atmosphere. Over the 10 yrs I lived there, I saw so much space taken over by developers, businesses, cramming more and more into the space that was left because San Fernando Valley, the LA basin and surrounding areas were just out of room.
    My daughter still lives there and visiting her is a traffic nightmare. The freeway is congested with apartments on all sides, hills scraped away to make room for new houses, prices are totally out of sight if you don’t make a bundle of money…and my heart hurts every time I see it and remember what it was. When will we learn that the value of life isn’t in how many people you can cram into a space, how many businesses we can create but in leaving some space for people to enjoy their lives out of their houses, open spaces where people can breathe and dream? Santa Clarita was once a beautiful place. It isn’t any longer. I moved to the midwest where we have conservancy areas within the city limits. I see deer, and all kinds of small animals when I walk my dog in the mornings. I don’t have to carry pepper spray in fear of being mugged. Beauty destroyed by people can’t be replaced. Shame on the corporations that are destroying what once was a gem in CA.

  79. I personally prefer the ‘gap’ just as it is.

  80. Oh yippee…. Enough already! Go build elsewhere.

  81. Emily Curren Emily Curren says:

    Good thing the 5 is being widened Bc you figure at least 1-2 cars per house and driving anywhere in the town especially during the go home and go to work and school traffic sucks!!! Not to mention the fact that getting classes at COC is already incredibly hard to get already!!! Keep adding on COC! When I was at the city council meeting that approved this I nearly fell over in my seat!

  82. Carole Lutness says:

    And don’t forget that Newhall Land is owned by some New York Hedge Funds which have absolutely no ties to this community. Their only goal is to continue their Scorch and Burn plan for this community and suck every drop of water out and money that they can, all to make their investors richer. We will be left with extreme water rationing because of the scam deal Newhall Land and CLWA pulled to have CLWA (illegally) buy Valencia Water so that Val Water will supply water to Newhall Ranch, etc. When you vote for Antonovich’s replacement, remember this. He never has met a developer he didn’t love which might also be said for our SCV City Council and CLWA Water Board as well.

  83. if we are in a drought why are we building houses?

  84. Because if SCV needs anything, it’s more people and overpriced homes.

  85. Just what California needs more houses and people really? What are they thinking or not thinking really?

  86. Just what California needs more houses and people really? What are they thinking or not thinking really?

  87. Derek Shaw says:

    Wow, look at all those anti-traffic, anti-housing development comments on Entrada South, which were posted on SCVNews. A few people even worried about where the water will come from for this new development.

    Water? Newhall Land has no worries.

    What voters, taxpayers and Santa Claritans do not realize is in the contract dated 12/12/12 whereby Newhall Land sold Valencia Water Company to Castaic Lake Water Agency, the geniuses at Castaic Lake Water Agency promised, in writing, around Article VI of the contract, that Castaic Lake Water Agency will supply all of the potable water needed for full development of Newhall Ranch and Newhall Land’s other projects…like Entrada South.

    How much water is needed by Newhall Land for future development? Every last drop of water which existing Santa Claritans are using right now. Your idiot elected officials have promised, in writing, to take ALL of your water away so that the Valley’s new residents, businesses and industries in Newhall Land properties can use it instead.

    Read the darn 12/12/12 contract people. Your elected officials have royally screwed you, but you keep electing them!

    p.s. Leon – Entrada South is also part of Newhall Ranch, in terms of several Federal, state and county permits and environmental mitigation plans.

    • SCVNews.com says:

      Right, it’s in Valencia, but it’s included in the same spineflower protection plan that was developed for the (separate) Newhall Ranch project. The 1,500+ homes of Entrada South are not part of the 21,000 homes in the Newhall Ranch project. Add Newhall Ranch together with Entrada North and South and it’s closer to 24,000 or 25,000 new homes.

  88. NewsView says:

    The respective City Planning Commissions and Redevelopment Agencies need to read the writing on the wall when it comes to new development:

    1) Expansion without accounting for local water resources forces reliance upon imported water, which is a recipe for instability and “held hostage” pricing.

    2) New retail space construction faces increased risk because more and more big box chain stores, like their mom & pop counterparts in the 1980s and 1990s, are succumbing to market pressure created by Internet retailers such as Amazon. Retail is not merely in a temporary slump but a wholesale change, much like the print news industry is struggling now to become profitable as they continue to lose print circulation.

    Established communities in Los Angeles, Orange County and elsewhere in the Southland are reclaiming land from shuttered auto dealerships and big box retail space in attempt to meet the tight housing demands that exist in LA/OC. That ought to be writing on the wall to the Newhall developers and City planners, alike.

    High desert developers should look at what’s happening, even, in high-economic growth areas in Orange County and elsewhere. Take, for example, the fact that it is possible to find the sites of the former Mervyns department stores, which closed down many years ago, STILL VACANT. Developers and City planners need to recognize that market forces are changing — PERMANENTLY — thanks to the Internet.

    Until just a few years ago, we used to have a number of big-box retailers compete in book sales (Borders/Barnes & Noble, Walden Books, B. Dalton, Bookstar, etc.). One by one, they dropped like flies leaving Barnes & Noble and Amazon the last leading suppliers to this market segment. Ditto in the office supply segment (OfficeDepot, OfficeMax, Staples); eventually, too, Staples and Amazon will remain the last competitors in this market segment. For a time, there were three big electronics/computer chains coexisting side-by-side (CompUSA, , Circuit City, Best Buy); now only Best Buy predominates on the bricks & mortar side and, again, Amazon on the Internet retail end. Ditto for household goods/linens: we used to have Anna’s Linens and Bed, Bath & Beyond but now BBB is the “last man standing” in the physical retail segment (with Wayfair making inroads on the Internet). Likewise, we have Target, Kmart and Walmart competing, with Kmart hanging on by a thread. We still have Kohls, JC Penney and Sears competing, but JC Penney is struggling and Kmart/Sears may be destined for the same fate as Montgomery Wards. (And don’t think for a second the self-cannibalization of the B&M retail landscape will stop with Kmart/Sears!)

    No matter WHERE you look, even Big Box retail is suffering huge losses in competitiveness and diversity. Until we, as a society, begin to get a better handle on how the Internet will forever CHANGE traditional retail space — and economic growth patterns on the whole — we should NOT be building out more shopping malls and retail space with the expectation of retaining, even, big-name national anchors.

    THE WRITING ON THE WALL

    1) Walmart made headlines in recent years when an executive email leaked out that stated “Where the hell are the customers???” (or words to such effect). There are only so many Walmarts, Targets, Kohls and the like that can go into a given area before it becomes over-saturated. In an over-saturated retail landscape, the developments effectively “steal” business from one another so that no one store performs adequately for the corporate masters to justify its continued existence (we saw this with many small towns in the 1980s, who saw their Mom & Pop stores go under when Walmart made an appearance, only for Walmart to pull up operations after determining that revenues did not justify its continued operation. This created veritable retail “ghost towns” in heartland communities).

    2) It’s not just economic slowdown that is causing “weak consumer demand”. If it were merely a function of economic downturn, a logical expectation would entail a retail rebound in times of economic growth. This time, however, all is not what it seems. Economic recovery or not, retail is in the midst of a transformation that regional planners and land developers currently appreciate about as well as the newspaper and magazine (print) industry comprehended, in the 1990s, that the Internet may KILL PRINT rather than expand its market share/reach.

    3) Consumers, in addition to turning in increasing numbers to the likes of Amazon, have been losing buying power to inflation in other sectors. Fixed household expenses are higher, reducing disposable incomes: housing, childcare costs, energy costs, food costs, etc. On paper, the median income level in Southern California is far above federal poverty standards. But, in fact, Southern California has the HIGHEST rate of poverty in the nation because it takes a six-figure income to live comfortably here (elsewhere in the country, a six-figure income might make you eligible for the proverbial “one percent”). Because of the steeper cost of living, SoCal families in the $50-$80K income ranges are taxed, by Uncle Sam, as if they’re in a solid middle class bracket. This means, in addition to housing and every other expense that is also higher, SoCal residents who make sub-six-figure incomes are effectively living at the lower end of the middle class *at best*.

    Bottom line? City, County and regional planners need to keep the Big Picture in mind. Developers and planners should rethink “business as usual” — because the usual set of assumptions about growth and demand — will no longer hold true going forward. The situation is a bifurcated one: SoCal has an undisputed housing shortage yet an over-supply of vacant retail space. One can deduce, based on these facts, that any NEW retail development, if it is within a 20-mile radius of an existing shopping mall or “parallel use” development, is likely cut into each respective shopping district’s growth. (Hence the term “self cannibalization”.)

    For years it was assumed that what was reasonable in terms of housing demand would yield a correspondent retail (and employment) growth pattern. The assumptions and the facts don’t always line up, however. The housing boom in the Inland Empire over the past 25 years has proven, for example, that living-wage jobs don’t always parallel economic development. Consequently, regional planners in the IE, AV, OC and LA areas should brace for the fact that new housing development may not lend itself to a thriving retail landscape, meaning that even the low-skill and service-sector job growth — let alone major economic development strides — cannot be assured going forward.

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SCV NewsBreak
LOCAL NEWS HEADLINES
Tuesday, Oct 4, 2022
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