header image

[Sign Up Now] to Receive Our FREE Daily SCVTV-SCVNews Digest by E-Mail

Inside
Weather
Santa Clarita CA
Sunny
Sunny
60°F
 
Calendar
Today in
S.C.V. History
December 3
1887 - Prohibitionist Henry Needham purchases land in Newhall, attempts to establish "dry" colony [story]
H.C. Needham


| Thursday, Apr 23, 2020
Unionized Hospitality Workers
File photo. Unionized hospitality workers apply for unemployment benefits at the Hospitality Training Academy on March 13, 2020, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

 

While the numbers are still unprecedented, the claims do appear to be leveling off.

By Amanda Pampuro

(CN) — With 11% of the Americans eligible for unemployment insurance benefits receiving them, the U.S. Department of Labor reported a new record of insured unemployment on Thursday. By the agency’s count, at least 20 million people, or about 6% of the total U.S. population, is out of work.

“The Covid-19 virus continues to impact the number of initial claims and insured unemployment,” the report explains. “This marks the highest level of the seasonally adjusted insured unemployment rate in the history of the seasonally adjusted series.”

Initial claims for unemployment benefits appear to be leveling off with 4.4 million claims filed last week, down from 5.2 million claims the previous week. This decrease comes as many state unemployment agencies catch up on a backlog of claims, and money trickles into pocketbooks from the $2.2 trillion CARES Act, short for Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security.

The Department of Labor used covered employment of 145,671,710 in its calculation, defining that term as American who are “unemployed through no fault of their own,” while also meeting certain work and wage requirements.

On average over the last month, an average of 5.5 million Americans filed initial claims for benefits each week.

Many more paychecks shrank, according to an April 3 Pew Research Center report that estimates 1 in 4 Americans are working reduced hours.

Investment firm Goldman Sachs projects unemployment will reach 15% by the end of the third quarter with few opportunities for re-employment.

The mountainous unemployment rate coincides with mounting pressure for state governments to relax stay-at-home orders and send people back to work.

“At some point people are going to have to back to work,” said Jeffrey Zax, a professor specializing in labor economics at the University of Colorado Boulder.

When and how soon will be determined by each state government.

“It’s easy for an individual to say, is it worse for me to stay at home and not work, or is it worse for me to go out into the world and continue in my job, but to counter the risk of getting sick?” Zax said. “What’s hard for an individual to do is to say, if I go out, how does that impact the health risks of others? The government has a very explicit responsibility to assist in that.”

Without downplaying the earth-shattering economic side effects of the pandemic, many economists argue social distancing now saves both lives and money in the long run. One recent cost-benefit analysis conducted by researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology connected speedy economic recovery with strict public health policy during the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic.

Colorado saw the largest increase in claims last week, with 58,246 news applications filed, followed by New York and Missouri. In total over the last month, the Centennial State received 279,199 applications, while paying out $74.1 million in benefits last week, the state Labor Department reported.

Payments from the federal Paycheck Protection Program will allow the owner of one independent bookstore to bring back employees this week.

“We have everybody back on payroll now. We have some folks working from home, some folks working here, and some folks still on the status of unpaid leave,” said Len Vlahos, owner of Tattered Cover Book Store, which has three locations in the Denver metro area. The stores closed to the public at 6 p.m. on March 16, but have since seen a spike in online sales.

Still Vlahos remained anxious about the future: “Financially, how comfortable people are going to be going out and shopping?”

As Colorado Governor Jared Polis switches the state from a stay-at-home order to a safe-at-home order on April 27, Tattered Cover hopes to run curbside book delivery.

When the government says it’s safe to open again, Vlahos said: “We will make sure we have a rigorous policy of sanitizing and social distancing. If there are a lot of restrictions on how people can go out and congregate, then we may have limited hours, we may allow only a certain number of people at a time. We may require masks.”

With some states allowing stay-at-home orders to lapse, and others tightening restrictions, Nevada Governor Steve Sisolak is reviewing options for the state facing the third-highest rate of insured unemployment in the country. At 13.7%, it trails Michigan and Rhode Island, with 17.4% and 15% of residents on benefits, respectively.

With a high tourist economy and service industry, many Nevada businesses are likely to struggle to adapt operations to social-distancing guidelines. While Las Vegas Mayor Carolyn Goodman is pressing for the strip to reopen, her stance is not without opposition.

“We want people back to work, but it has to be safe and secure, and we don’t want workers to be part of an experiment. Workplaces need to be safe and healthy — not a Petri dish,” Geoconda Argüello-Kline, secretary-treasurer of the Culinary Workers Union Local 226, said in a statement.

The tension is felt across the state. In Fernley, Nevada, east of Reno, one casino bartender worries about returning to work too soon.

“The casinos are going to be fine,” said Lisa, who asked that her last name not be used. A bartender of 14 years, Lisa is now receiving state unemployment benefits. “As soon as they open up, those casino people are going to come in. And, with people being out as long as they have, a lot of them are retired with fixed income, so they’re saving up all this money, not going in there every day.”

Lisa doesn’t want to babysit customers when it comes to enforcing social distancing. As a single mom, caring for her own mother through chemotherapy, she said she’s worried that she’ll contract the virus and spread it to her family.

“You can always make money,” Lisa said. “You can’t bring back somebody’s life.”

The U.S. Department of Labor report can be viewed below:

 

[Open .pdf in new window]

Comment On This Story
COMMENT POLICY: We welcome comments from individuals and businesses. All comments are moderated. Comments are subject to rejection if they are vulgar, combative, or in poor taste.
REAL NAMES ONLY: All posters must use their real individual or business name. This applies equally to Twitter account holders who use a nickname.

0 Comments

You can be the first one to leave a comment.

Leave a Comment


SCV NewsBreak
LOCAL NEWS HEADLINES
Thursday, Dec 3, 2020
Tejon Ranch Accused of Violating Pact to Fund Conservation
(CN) — Real estate developers who promised to fund a nonprofit dedicated to preserving 90% of a 270,000-acre property north of Los Angeles are violating a 12-year-old pact by cutting their quarterly conservation payments, environmental groups claim in a new lawsuit.
Wednesday, Dec 2, 2020
Wednesday COVID-19 Roundup: Record Hospitalizations in L.A. County; SCV Total Cases Top 10K
The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health on Wednesday reported 40 new deaths and 5,987 new confirmed cases of COVID-19 countywide, as the total number of Santa Clarita Valley residents diagnosed with the virus topped 10,000.
Wednesday, Dec 2, 2020
Lawmakers Demand Answers from Bank of America on Draining of EDD Accounts
California Senator Scott Wilk (R-Santa Clarita) and more than 50 other lawmakers are demanding answers from Bank of America surrounding the state Employment Development Department’s latest problem: the freezing and draining of unemployment benefits in EDD accounts.
Keep Up With Our Facebook

Latest Additions to SCVNews.com
JCI Santa Clarita, a premier young professional organization in the community, is partnering with our local WiSH Education Foundation to present the First Annual Virtual WiSH Run starting Friday, Jan. 1 - Saturday, Jan 9.
JCI Santa Clarita, WiSH Foundation Partner for Inaugural Virtual WiSH Run
(CN) — Real estate developers who promised to fund a nonprofit dedicated to preserving 90% of a 270,000-acre property north of Los Angeles are violating a 12-year-old pact by cutting their quarterly conservation payments, environmental groups claim in a new lawsuit.
Tejon Ranch Accused of Violating Pact to Fund Conservation
The city of Santa Clarita encourages interested residents to apply for several positions serving on the Arts Commission; the Parks, Recreation and Community Services Commission; the Planning Commission; and the Open Space Preservation District Financial Accountability and Audit Panel (FAAP).
Santa Clarita Seeking Local Residents for Appointment Vacancies
GreenPal, an app that connects homeowners with local, vetted lawn care professionals, is launching this week in Santa Clarita.
GreenPal Lawn Mowing App Launches in Santa Clarita
The Santa Clarita Valley Education Foundation (SCVEF) is pleased to announce that they will be hosting a virtual Teacher Tribute on Friday, Dec. 4, at 4:00 p.m.
Dec. 4: SCV Education Foundation’s Virtual Teacher Tribute
1887 - Prohibitionist Henry Needham purchases land in Newhall, attempts to establish "dry" colony [story]
H.C. Needham
The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health on Wednesday reported 40 new deaths and 5,987 new confirmed cases of COVID-19 countywide, as the total number of Santa Clarita Valley residents diagnosed with the virus topped 10,000.
Wednesday COVID-19 Roundup: Record Hospitalizations in L.A. County; SCV Total Cases Top 10K
In response to the current surge of COVID-19 cases, the Los Angeles County Department of Parks and Recreation is suspending in-person outdoor programs in accordance with the county's Nov. 30 "Safer At Home" Health Officer Order to stop the spread of COVID-19.
L.A. County Parks Halt In-Person Outdoor Programs Due to COVID-19 Surge
The California Interscholastic Federation or CIF has postponed youth sports competitions including championship events until at least Jan. 1, due to the surge in COVID-19 cases statewide.
CIF Postpones Education-Based Athletics into 2021
California Senator Scott Wilk (R-Santa Clarita) and more than 50 other lawmakers are demanding answers from Bank of America surrounding the state Employment Development Department’s latest problem: the freezing and draining of unemployment benefits in EDD accounts.
Lawmakers Demand Answers from Bank of America on Draining of EDD Accounts
Noah Michael Englerth of Castaic has been missing a month, and Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department Missing Persons Unit investigators are asking for the public’s help locating him.
Missing: Noah Englerth of Castaic; LASD Asks Public’s Help
With a multiday Red Flag warning issued throughout Southern California, multiple parts of the Santa Clarita Valley remained under consideration for power shutoffs Wednesday.
SCE Warns of Power Shutoffs, State Readies Fire Resources
Santa Ana winds are forecast to return this week, bringing another fire weather watch to the Santa Clarita Valley after thousands across the region faced power shutoffs on Thanksgiving.
Santa Ana Winds Return, SCV Under Fire Weather Watch
A spokesman for the William S. Hart Union High School District confirmed Tuesday a food services worker “participating in meal service on (Nov. 23-24) at Golden Valley High School has since tested positive for COVID-19.”
Hart District Confirms GVHS Food Worker Diagnosed with COVD-19
1972 - Five wounded in Vagos biker gang shooting at Curtis & JoAnne Darcy's Acton '49er Saloon [story]
Darcys 49er
SCV Water ongoing communication efforts surrounding per- and polyfluoroalkyl (PFAS) chemicals were honored with a PRism Award from the Public Relations Society of America – Los Angeles Chapter (PRSA-LA).
SCV Water’s PFAS Community Outreach Earns Top Honors
What is the most effective way for the city of Santa Clarita to allocate Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funding?
Residents Encouraged to Provide Input on 2021-22 Community Needs Survey
Licensed in 1980, Randal G. Winter Construction is proudly celebrating their 40th year in business.
Santa Clarita-Based Randal G. Winter Construction Celebrates 40 Years
The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health confirmed Tuesday the highest number of new COVID-19 cases and people hospitalized with COVID-19 that L.A. County has ever experienced throughout the pandemic.
Tuesday COVID-19 Roundup: Highest One-Day Increase Countywide to Date, SCV Surpasses 9,900 Cases
In an effort to assist restaurants affected by the COVID-19 restrictions, Los Angeles County will launch the Keep L.A. County Dining Grant Program on Thursday, Dec. 3, at 12:00 a.m.
L.A. County Launches Grant Program for Restaurants Affected by COVID-19 Restrictions
Registration is underway for the College of the Canyons winter session, which boasts more than 300 class sections.
COC’s Winter 2021 Semester Registration Underway
The Los Angeles County Parks and Recreation announced Monday Alina Bokde as the department’s Chief Deputy Director.
Alina Bokde Appointed New Chief Deputy Director for L.A. County Parks
The city of Santa Clarita is seeking to attain more local control of the development of accessory dwelling units through a proposed update of its development code and an ordinance.
Planning Commission Scheduled to Discuss Amendments to Accessory Dwelling Units
Bringing‌ ‌to‌ ‌life‌ ‌the‌ ‌national‌ ‌conversation‌ ‌of‌ ‌the‌ ‌trials‌ ‌and‌ ‌tribulations‌ ‌of‌ ‌2020,‌ the College ‌of‌ ‌the‌ ‌Canyons‌ ‌Theatre‌ ‌Department‌ will present its ‌devised‌ ‌production‌ ‌“Virtuality: the 2020 Tournaments,”‌ ‌on December 4-5.
COC Theatre Department Presents Pandemic-Themed Production
%d bloggers like this: